Wider institutional research cultures and their influence on patient and public involvement and engagement in health research – An institutional ethnography

Anne Wettergren Karlsson*, Anne Kragh-Sørensen, Kirsten Børgesen, Karsten Erik Behrens, Torben Andersen, Karen Margrethe Maglekær, Mette Juel Rothmann, Marjolijn Ketelaar, Esben Nedenskov Petersen, Astrid Janssens

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Focus on patient and public involvement and engagement (PPIE) is increasing in health policy and research governance. PPIE is considered by some to be a democratic right, and by others to be a way to improve health care and research outcomes and implementation. Most recently, policy makers, funders and (clinical) research institutions are making PPIE a strategic requirement for health research urging researchers to invite patients and relatives into their research activities. Our study is based in a Danish university hospital where PPIE has been introduced as one of five strategic research goals. We investigated how researchers experienced this new practice and how their research practices connect to the wider context of the Danish health care system. Ten cases were studied during a year using observations, interviews, and document analysis. As our method of inquiry, we used institutional ethnography to look at researchers’ work from their perspective and to understand how PPIE practices are part of a larger institutional research culture reaching far beyond the individual. We found that current research culture has implications for the selection of patients and relatives and for what they are asked to do. Researchers who experienced that PPIE outcomes aided their existing research practices felt motivated. Researchers who engaged patients and relatives before it was a strategy, were ideologically driven and their approaches resulted in an increased diversity of inclusion and researcher assimilation. These findings add to the current knowledge on PPIE practices and help us understand that further development towards collaborative research practices require a change in key performance indicators and training and perhaps call for attention to our shared acceptance of knowledge generation in research.

Original languageEnglish
Article number116773
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume347
ISSN0277-9536
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2024

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