Why do tougher caseworkers increase employment?

The role of programme assignment as a causal mechanism

Martin Huber, Michael Lechner, Giovanni Mellace

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Previous research found that less accommodating caseworkers are more successful in placing unemployed workers into employment. This paper explores the causal mechanisms behind this result using semiparametric mediation analysis. Analysing rich linked jobseeker-caseworker data for Switzerland, we find that the positive employment effects of less accommodating caseworkers are not driven by a particularly effective mix of labour market programmes, but rather by other dimensions of the counselling process, possibly including threat effects of sanctions and pressure to accept jobs.
Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Review of Economics and Statistics
Volume99
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)180-183
ISSN0034-6535
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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effect on employment
Switzerland
sanction
mediation
counseling
labor market
threat
worker
Threat
Mediation
Workers
Labour market
Counseling
Assignment
Employment effects
Placing
Sanctions

Cite this

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Why do tougher caseworkers increase employment? The role of programme assignment as a causal mechanism. / Huber, Martin; Lechner, Michael; Mellace, Giovanni.

In: The Review of Economics and Statistics, Vol. 99, No. 1, 2017, p. 180-183.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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