'What an Eye-opener': a qualitative study of vulnerable citizens participating in a municipality-based intervention

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Abstract

Purpose: To explore how psychologically vulnerable citizens experienced performing their everyday-life activities, identify activities experienced as particularly challenging and evaluate the significance of the Acceptance and Commitment Theory-based (ACT)-based program, Well-being in Daily Life, had on the participants everyday-life activities. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight participants from the Well-being in Daily Life program. Data were analysed using Systematic Text Condensation. Results and Conclusion: The participants experienced anxiety, fatigue, lack of structure, and chaos when performing their everyday-life activities; in addition to being uncertain about the limitations of their own resources. Furthermore, balancing between demands and resources was challenging, also leading to uncertainty and identity conflicts that contributed to the participants’ concerns about re-entering the workforce. The program enabled the participants to develop social skills and trust which contributed to providing the participants with confidence, individually-tailored-possibilities for developing new competencies and courage; thus, facilitating their recovery process.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1438698
JournalInternational Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being
Volume13
Issue number1
Number of pages11
ISSN1748-2623
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Uncertainty
Interviews
Social Skills
Conflict (Psychology)
Courage

Keywords

  • Activities of Daily Living
  • Adaptation, Psychological
  • Adult
  • Anxiety/therapy
  • Behavior Therapy
  • Courage
  • Fatigue/therapy
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Mental Disorders/complications
  • Middle Aged
  • Qualitative Research
  • Quality of Life
  • Self Efficacy
  • Social Skills
  • Stress, Psychological/etiology
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Trust
  • Vulnerable Populations

Cite this

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title = "'What an Eye-opener': a qualitative study of vulnerable citizens participating in a municipality-based intervention",
abstract = "Purpose: To explore how psychologically vulnerable citizens experienced performing their everyday-life activities, identify activities experienced as particularly challenging and evaluate the significance of the Acceptance and Commitment Theory-based (ACT)-based program, Well-being in Daily Life, had on the participants everyday-life activities. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight participants from the Well-being in Daily Life program. Data were analysed using Systematic Text Condensation. Results and Conclusion: The participants experienced anxiety, fatigue, lack of structure, and chaos when performing their everyday-life activities; in addition to being uncertain about the limitations of their own resources. Furthermore, balancing between demands and resources was challenging, also leading to uncertainty and identity conflicts that contributed to the participants’ concerns about re-entering the workforce. The program enabled the participants to develop social skills and trust which contributed to providing the participants with confidence, individually-tailored-possibilities for developing new competencies and courage; thus, facilitating their recovery process.",
keywords = "Activities of Daily Living, Adaptation, Psychological, Adult, Anxiety/therapy, Behavior Therapy, Courage, Fatigue/therapy, Female, Humans, Male, Mental Disorders/complications, Middle Aged, Qualitative Research, Quality of Life, Self Efficacy, Social Skills, Stress, Psychological/etiology, Surveys and Questionnaires, Trust, Vulnerable Populations",
author = "Ilvig, {Pia Maria} and Michaela Kj{\ae}r and Jones, {Dorrie Lee} and Christensen, {Jeanette Reffstrup} and {Nygaard Andersen}, Lotte",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1080/17482631.2018.1438698",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
journal = "International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being",
issn = "1748-2623",
publisher = "Co-Action Publishing",
number = "1",

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AU - Ilvig, Pia Maria

AU - Kjær, Michaela

AU - Jones, Dorrie Lee

AU - Christensen, Jeanette Reffstrup

AU - Nygaard Andersen, Lotte

PY - 2018

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N2 - Purpose: To explore how psychologically vulnerable citizens experienced performing their everyday-life activities, identify activities experienced as particularly challenging and evaluate the significance of the Acceptance and Commitment Theory-based (ACT)-based program, Well-being in Daily Life, had on the participants everyday-life activities. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight participants from the Well-being in Daily Life program. Data were analysed using Systematic Text Condensation. Results and Conclusion: The participants experienced anxiety, fatigue, lack of structure, and chaos when performing their everyday-life activities; in addition to being uncertain about the limitations of their own resources. Furthermore, balancing between demands and resources was challenging, also leading to uncertainty and identity conflicts that contributed to the participants’ concerns about re-entering the workforce. The program enabled the participants to develop social skills and trust which contributed to providing the participants with confidence, individually-tailored-possibilities for developing new competencies and courage; thus, facilitating their recovery process.

AB - Purpose: To explore how psychologically vulnerable citizens experienced performing their everyday-life activities, identify activities experienced as particularly challenging and evaluate the significance of the Acceptance and Commitment Theory-based (ACT)-based program, Well-being in Daily Life, had on the participants everyday-life activities. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight participants from the Well-being in Daily Life program. Data were analysed using Systematic Text Condensation. Results and Conclusion: The participants experienced anxiety, fatigue, lack of structure, and chaos when performing their everyday-life activities; in addition to being uncertain about the limitations of their own resources. Furthermore, balancing between demands and resources was challenging, also leading to uncertainty and identity conflicts that contributed to the participants’ concerns about re-entering the workforce. The program enabled the participants to develop social skills and trust which contributed to providing the participants with confidence, individually-tailored-possibilities for developing new competencies and courage; thus, facilitating their recovery process.

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KW - Anxiety/therapy

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KW - Male

KW - Mental Disorders/complications

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KW - Self Efficacy

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KW - Stress, Psychological/etiology

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