Voluntary low-force contraction elicits prolonged low-frequency fatigue and changes in surface electromyography and mechanomyography

Anne Katrine Blangsted, Gisela Sjøgaard, Pascal Madeleine, Henrik Baare Olsen, Karen Søgaard

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Controversies exist regarding objective documentation of fatigue development with low-force contractions. We hypothesized that non-exhaustive, low-force muscle contraction may induce prolonged low-frequency fatigue (LFF) that in the subsequent recovery period is detectable by electromyography (EMG) and in particular mechanomyography (MMG) during low-force rather than high-force test contractions. Seven subjects performed static wrist extension at 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) for 10 min (10%MVC10 min). Wrist force response to electrical stimulation of extensor carpi radialis muscle (ECR) quantified LFF. EMG and MMG were recorded from ECR during static test contractions at 5% and 80% MVC. Electrical stimulation, MVC, and test contractions were performed before 10%MVC10 min and at 10, 30, 90 and 150 min recovery. In spite of no changes in MVC, LFF persisted up to 150 min recovery but did not develop in a control experiment omitting 10%MVC10 min. In 5% MVC tests significant increase was found in time domain of EMG from 0.067+/-0.028 mV before 10%MVC10 min to 0.107+/-0.049 and 0.087+/-0.05 mV at 10 and 30 min recovery, respectively, and of the MMG from 0.054+/-0.039 ms(-2) to 0.133+/-0.104 and 0.127+/-0.099 ms(-2), respectively. No consistent changes were found in 80% MVC tests. In conclusion, non-exhaustive low-force muscle contraction resulted in prolonged LFF that in part was identified by the EMG and MMG signals.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Electromyography & Kinesiology
Volume15
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)138-48
Number of pages10
ISSN1050-6411
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1. Apr 2005

Fingerprint

Electromyography
Wrist
Electric Stimulation
Muscles
Documentation

Cite this

@article{e68ccb80452b11dd9fbe000ea68e967b,
title = "Voluntary low-force contraction elicits prolonged low-frequency fatigue and changes in surface electromyography and mechanomyography",
abstract = "Controversies exist regarding objective documentation of fatigue development with low-force contractions. We hypothesized that non-exhaustive, low-force muscle contraction may induce prolonged low-frequency fatigue (LFF) that in the subsequent recovery period is detectable by electromyography (EMG) and in particular mechanomyography (MMG) during low-force rather than high-force test contractions. Seven subjects performed static wrist extension at 10{\%} maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) for 10 min (10{\%}MVC10 min). Wrist force response to electrical stimulation of extensor carpi radialis muscle (ECR) quantified LFF. EMG and MMG were recorded from ECR during static test contractions at 5{\%} and 80{\%} MVC. Electrical stimulation, MVC, and test contractions were performed before 10{\%}MVC10 min and at 10, 30, 90 and 150 min recovery. In spite of no changes in MVC, LFF persisted up to 150 min recovery but did not develop in a control experiment omitting 10{\%}MVC10 min. In 5{\%} MVC tests significant increase was found in time domain of EMG from 0.067+/-0.028 mV before 10{\%}MVC10 min to 0.107+/-0.049 and 0.087+/-0.05 mV at 10 and 30 min recovery, respectively, and of the MMG from 0.054+/-0.039 ms(-2) to 0.133+/-0.104 and 0.127+/-0.099 ms(-2), respectively. No consistent changes were found in 80{\%} MVC tests. In conclusion, non-exhaustive low-force muscle contraction resulted in prolonged LFF that in part was identified by the EMG and MMG signals.",
author = "Blangsted, {Anne Katrine} and Gisela Sj{\o}gaard and Pascal Madeleine and Olsen, {Henrik Baare} and Karen S{\o}gaard",
year = "2005",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jelekin.2004.10.004",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "138--48",
journal = "Journal of Electromyography & Kinesiology",
issn = "1050-6411",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2",

}

Voluntary low-force contraction elicits prolonged low-frequency fatigue and changes in surface electromyography and mechanomyography. / Blangsted, Anne Katrine; Sjøgaard, Gisela; Madeleine, Pascal; Olsen, Henrik Baare; Søgaard, Karen.

In: Journal of Electromyography & Kinesiology, Vol. 15, No. 2, 01.04.2005, p. 138-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Voluntary low-force contraction elicits prolonged low-frequency fatigue and changes in surface electromyography and mechanomyography

AU - Blangsted, Anne Katrine

AU - Sjøgaard, Gisela

AU - Madeleine, Pascal

AU - Olsen, Henrik Baare

AU - Søgaard, Karen

PY - 2005/4/1

Y1 - 2005/4/1

N2 - Controversies exist regarding objective documentation of fatigue development with low-force contractions. We hypothesized that non-exhaustive, low-force muscle contraction may induce prolonged low-frequency fatigue (LFF) that in the subsequent recovery period is detectable by electromyography (EMG) and in particular mechanomyography (MMG) during low-force rather than high-force test contractions. Seven subjects performed static wrist extension at 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) for 10 min (10%MVC10 min). Wrist force response to electrical stimulation of extensor carpi radialis muscle (ECR) quantified LFF. EMG and MMG were recorded from ECR during static test contractions at 5% and 80% MVC. Electrical stimulation, MVC, and test contractions were performed before 10%MVC10 min and at 10, 30, 90 and 150 min recovery. In spite of no changes in MVC, LFF persisted up to 150 min recovery but did not develop in a control experiment omitting 10%MVC10 min. In 5% MVC tests significant increase was found in time domain of EMG from 0.067+/-0.028 mV before 10%MVC10 min to 0.107+/-0.049 and 0.087+/-0.05 mV at 10 and 30 min recovery, respectively, and of the MMG from 0.054+/-0.039 ms(-2) to 0.133+/-0.104 and 0.127+/-0.099 ms(-2), respectively. No consistent changes were found in 80% MVC tests. In conclusion, non-exhaustive low-force muscle contraction resulted in prolonged LFF that in part was identified by the EMG and MMG signals.

AB - Controversies exist regarding objective documentation of fatigue development with low-force contractions. We hypothesized that non-exhaustive, low-force muscle contraction may induce prolonged low-frequency fatigue (LFF) that in the subsequent recovery period is detectable by electromyography (EMG) and in particular mechanomyography (MMG) during low-force rather than high-force test contractions. Seven subjects performed static wrist extension at 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) for 10 min (10%MVC10 min). Wrist force response to electrical stimulation of extensor carpi radialis muscle (ECR) quantified LFF. EMG and MMG were recorded from ECR during static test contractions at 5% and 80% MVC. Electrical stimulation, MVC, and test contractions were performed before 10%MVC10 min and at 10, 30, 90 and 150 min recovery. In spite of no changes in MVC, LFF persisted up to 150 min recovery but did not develop in a control experiment omitting 10%MVC10 min. In 5% MVC tests significant increase was found in time domain of EMG from 0.067+/-0.028 mV before 10%MVC10 min to 0.107+/-0.049 and 0.087+/-0.05 mV at 10 and 30 min recovery, respectively, and of the MMG from 0.054+/-0.039 ms(-2) to 0.133+/-0.104 and 0.127+/-0.099 ms(-2), respectively. No consistent changes were found in 80% MVC tests. In conclusion, non-exhaustive low-force muscle contraction resulted in prolonged LFF that in part was identified by the EMG and MMG signals.

U2 - 10.1016/j.jelekin.2004.10.004

DO - 10.1016/j.jelekin.2004.10.004

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 15664144

VL - 15

SP - 138

EP - 148

JO - Journal of Electromyography & Kinesiology

JF - Journal of Electromyography & Kinesiology

SN - 1050-6411

IS - 2

ER -