Ventriculosinus shunt: a pilot study to investigate new technology to treat hydrocephalus and mimic physiological principles of cerebrospinal fluid drainage

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Devices draining CSF to the intracranial venous sinus for the treatment of hydrocephalus have been tested in the past, and while clinically effective, have not shown efficacy in the long term. The majority of these devices become obstructed within 3 months due to endothelial overgrowth. In this study, the authors investigated a newly developed ventriculosinus (VS) shunt outlet device with the objective of showing it would remain patent for at least 6 months.

METHODS: Twelve patients in need of shunting for hydrocephalus underwent an operation using the investigational device and were followed for 6 months to record patency of the shunt.

RESULTS: In 10 patients, the shunt was patent at 6 months, with the outlet device remaining unobstructed. In the remaining 2 patients, one died just before reaching the 6-month endpoint, and in the other the outlet was misplaced during surgery and therefore ceased to function after 3 months. No occlusion of the internal jugular vein or thrombus formation was noted in any of the 12 cases.

CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that the outlet device can remain patent and has the capability to mimic physiological drainage by diverting CSF to the intracranial sinus. Additional confirmation of its potential as part of a new VS shunt system and ultimately as a viable alternative for ventriculoperitoneal and ventriculoatrial shunting to reduce complication rates requires further clinical trials.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume139
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)1412-1419
ISSN0022-3085
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1. Nov 2023

Keywords

  • Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak/surgery
  • Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunts
  • Humans
  • Hydrocephalus/surgery
  • Pilot Projects
  • Technology
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt

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