Use of beta-blockers and risk of serious upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a population-based case-control study

Mette Reilev, Per Damkier, Lotte Rasmussen, Morten Olesen, Martin Thomsen Ernst, Rikke Mie Rishøj, Morten Rix Hansen, Anne Broe, Alexander Steenberg Dastrup, Maja Hellfritzsch, Sidsel Arnspang, Anton Pottegård, Jesper Hallas

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Abstract

Background: Some studies indicate a reduced risk of serious upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) for users of beta-blockers, but the association remains to be confirmed in larger studies and characterized with respect to differences among beta-blockers. We aimed to assess whether beta-blocker use decreases the risk of UGIB.

Methods: We conducted a register-based, population-based case-control study in Denmark. We identified cases with a first validated discharge diagnosis of UGIB during the period 1995-2006. Controls were selected by risk-set sampling in a ratio of 10:1. We estimated crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of the association between current beta-blocker use and the risk of UGIB by using conditional logistic regression and further stratified by selective and non-selective beta-blockers, respectively.

Results: We identified 3571 UGIB cases and 35,582 controls. Use of beta-blockers was not found to be associated with a decreased risk of UGIB (adjusted OR 1.10; 95% CI: 1.00-1.21). The association remained neutral after stratification by selective and non-selective beta-blockers, and by single beta-blocker substances. Similarly, we found no association between current beta-blocker use and the risk of UGIB within different subgroups.

Conclusions: We found no association between beta-blocker use and UGIB.

Original languageEnglish
JournalTherapeutic Advances in Gastroenterology
Volume10
Issue number12
Pages (from-to)919-929
ISSN1756-283X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Journal Article

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