Understanding the consumer acceptance of mobile shopping: the role of consumer shopping orientations and mobile shopping touchpoints

Michael Groβ, Stefanie Sohn*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Current research emphasizes that consumer acceptance of mobile (m-)shopping increases overall order rate and size. However, there has been little knowledge on factors determining this acceptance. This study develops and empirically tests a model explaining the consumer acceptance of m-shopping by incorporating intrinsic (perceived enjoyment) and extrinsic (perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use) behavioural beliefs as well as consumer shopping orientations. A quantitative survey conducted among German smartphone users across different age groups reveals that both intrinsic and extrinsic beliefs determine consumer acceptance of m-shopping, while consumer shopping orientations shape the beliefs of m-shopping. In particular, the greater the consumers’ brand consciousness, novelty-seeking tendency, and impulsiveness the greater the perceived usefulness and/or enjoyment of m-shopping; however, consumers’ convenience consciousness weakens the perceived enjoyment. The results further indicate that the effects of shopping orientations on the beliefs are largely independent of the type of m-shopping touchpoint (i.e., m-app and m-browser). The findings provide recommendations for retailers on how to promote m-shopping and offer scholars a broad and consumer-oriented explanation of the acceptance of m-shopping.

Original languageEnglish
JournalThe International Review of Retail, Distribution and Consumer Research
Volume31
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)36-58
ISSN0959-3969
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • acceptance
  • app
  • Mobile shopping
  • shopping orientations
  • touchpoints

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