Two-year treatment programme showed that younger age and initial weight loss predicted better results in overweight and obese children aged 2-16 years

Sina Dalby*, Signe Vahlkvist, Inge Østergaard, Joan Park Jørgensen, Claus Bogh Juhl

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

97 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Aim: We investigated an outpatient programme that followed the Danish Paediatric Society's recommended multidisciplinary approach to treating overweight and obesity. Methods: Our cohort comprised 179 participants (55.3% girls) treated from April 2011 until March 2016 at the Hospital of Southwest Jutland, Esbjerg, Denmark. The participant's age ranged from 2.3 to 16.6 years. The body mass index-standard deviation score was registered at inclusion and after three, 12 and 24 months. Results: The girls were more obese than the boys at inclusion, and the mean reduction in the body mass index-standard deviation score was 0.3 units during the study. Half of the participants achieved a reduction in body mass index-standard deviation score of at least 0.25 units, and the frequency of obesity and severe obesity decreased from 69.3% to 47.5%. Predictors of weight loss were younger age and weight loss during the first 3 months. More than half (53.1%) completed the programme, and they were more likely to be younger and male. Conclusion: The two-year programme reduced the body mass index-standard deviation score and the frequency of obesity. Younger age and early weight loss predicted success and younger age, and male sex predicted completion rates.

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
Volume109
Issue number8
Pages (from-to)1649-1655
ISSN0803-5253
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2020

Keywords

  • chronic care model
  • multidisciplinary programme
  • obesity
  • overweight
  • predictors

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Two-year treatment programme showed that younger age and initial weight loss predicted better results in overweight and obese children aged 2-16 years'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this