Trade-offs in the formation of consumer purchase intentions with regard to complex genetically modified products

Lone Bredahl, Helle Alsted Søndergaard, Klaus G. Grunert, Joachim Scholderer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearch

Abstract

Consumers' product choices are increasingly influenced not only by the attributes of the products themselves, but also by characteristics of the way in which the product have been produced, including factors like origin, working conditions, and production technology. Genetic modification (GM) is a production technology whose application to the food domain is highly controversial to consumers in many parts of the western world. The research investigates consumer reactions to applications of genetic modification to produce enzymes that result in improved performance of target products, both at consumer and producer level, by means of a conjoint study comprising 1,200 respondents in three European countries. Results show the nature of the enzymatic production method (GM or non-GM) to override both price advantages and product and process benefits. This indicates that at present the successful marketing of products manufactured by means of genetic modification is contingent on consumer acceptance of genetic modification as such, and only secondarily on the obtained benefits
Translated title of the contributionTrade-offs in the formation of consumer purchase intentions with regard to complex genetically modified products
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIkke angivet
PublisherAustralian Scholarly Publishing
Publication date2004
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

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