The ‘taking place’ of learning in computer games: Qualitative studies on learning strategies in digital media

Lasse Juel Larsen, Lars Bo Løfgreen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In the long-standing tradition for discounting digital technologies as a learning resource within the formal educational setting, computer games have often either been marked as distraction or totally ignored. However, as argued in the paradigmatic text by Shaffer, Squire, Halverson and Gee, Video Games and The Future of Learning, computer games do not only offer an interesting perspective on how “learners can understand complex concepts without losing the connection between abstract ideas and the real problems”, but can as well cast “a glimpse into how we might create new and more powerful ways to learn in schools, communities, and workplaces – new ways to learn for a new Information Age”[1].

 In line with this general approach to seeing computer games as a reservoir of learning strategies and potentials, this paper aims to examine how a specific computer game teach us how to play the game.

[1] Schaffer et al. Video Games and The Future of Learning (2005)
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDigital Content Creation: Creativity, Competence, Critique : CONFERENCE PAPERS
Number of pages7
PublisherDREAM
Publication date2008
Publication statusPublished - 2008
EventDigital Content Creation: Creativity, Competence, Critique - Odsense, Denmark
Duration: 18. Sept 200820. Sept 2008

Conference

ConferenceDigital Content Creation: Creativity, Competence, Critique
Country/TerritoryDenmark
CityOdsense
Period18/09/200820/09/2008

Keywords

  • learning, computer games, qualitative studies, guitar hero 3

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