The NATO Response Force: A qualified failure no more?

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

With much fanfare, NATO declared its rapid reaction force—the NATO Response Force (NRF)—an Initial Operational Capability in 2004. This article addresses four questions: Where did the NRF come from? What does it look like in 2017? What have been the major obstacles for the NRF fulfilling its promises? And where is the NRF likely to go? The article holds two main arguments. First, due to inadequate fill-rates and disagreements as to the force’s operational role, the NRF was for many years a “qualified failure.” The force failed to become the operational tool envisioned by the allies in 2002. While not without effect, it fell hostage to the harsh reality of the expeditionary wars of Iraq and Afghanistan. Second, the NRF is off to a fresh beginning and will likely be considered at least a partial success by the allies in the years to come.

Original languageEnglish
JournalContemporary Security Policy
Volume38
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)443-456
ISSN1352-3260
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2. Sep 2017

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NATO
allies
Afghanistan
Iraq

Keywords

  • NATO
  • NATO Response Force
  • Very High Readiness Joint Task Force
  • transformation

Cite this

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title = "The NATO Response Force: A qualified failure no more?",
abstract = "With much fanfare, NATO declared its rapid reaction force—the NATO Response Force (NRF)—an Initial Operational Capability in 2004. This article addresses four questions: Where did the NRF come from? What does it look like in 2017? What have been the major obstacles for the NRF fulfilling its promises? And where is the NRF likely to go? The article holds two main arguments. First, due to inadequate fill-rates and disagreements as to the force’s operational role, the NRF was for many years a “qualified failure.” The force failed to become the operational tool envisioned by the allies in 2002. While not without effect, it fell hostage to the harsh reality of the expeditionary wars of Iraq and Afghanistan. Second, the NRF is off to a fresh beginning and will likely be considered at least a partial success by the allies in the years to come.",
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The NATO Response Force : A qualified failure no more? / Ringsmose, Jens; Rynning, Sten.

In: Contemporary Security Policy, Vol. 38, No. 3, 02.09.2017, p. 443-456.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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