The macrophage activation marker sMR as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in patients with acute infectious disease with or without sepsis

Mette Marie Relster, Shahin Gaini, Holger Jon Møller, Isik Somuncu Johansen, Court Pedersen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Sepsis is a leading cause of mortality. This study aims to assess the utility of the soluble mannose receptor (sMR) as a biomarker of sepsis and mortality in patients hospitalized with suspected infection. Using an in-house ELISA assay the concentration of sMR was analyzed in the serum of patients from three prospective studies. Using Sepsis-3 guidelines, patients were stratified as no infection (NI, n = 68), verified infection without sepsis (NSEP, n = 133) and verified infection with sepsis (SEP, n = 190). Adverse outcome was assessed as death before 28 days. We show that the sensitivity of sMR to predict mortality [area under curve (AUC) = 0.77] exceeded the sensitivity of procalcitonin (PCT, AUC = 0.63), C-reactive protein (CRP, AUC = 0.61) and the macrophage soluble receptor, CD163 (sCD163, AUC = 0.74), while it was less accurate to predict diagnosis of sepsis [AUC(sMR) = 0.69 vs. AUC(PCT) = 0.79, AUC(CRP) = 0.71 and AUC(sCD163) = 0.66]. Median sMR was significantly higher in the group with SEP (0.55 mg/L), compared with the groups without sepsis (NI and NSEP) (0.39 mg/L, p < .0001), and among those who died compared to those who survived (0.89 mg/L vs. 0.44 mg/L, p < .0001). Our results, and the current literature, support further evaluation of sMR as a biomarker of sepsis and mortality among patients hospitalized with suspected infection.

Original languageEnglish
JournalScandinavian Journal of Clinical & Laboratory Investigation
Volume78
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)180-186
ISSN0036-5513
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Macrophage Activation
Acute Disease
Area Under Curve
mannose receptor
Macrophages
Prospective Studies
Guidelines
Serum

Keywords

  • Journal Article

Cite this

@article{6715f3284aee4ee98e59e9c5fd73e818,
title = "The macrophage activation marker sMR as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in patients with acute infectious disease with or without sepsis",
abstract = "Sepsis is a leading cause of mortality. This study aims to assess the utility of the soluble mannose receptor (sMR) as a biomarker of sepsis and mortality in patients hospitalized with suspected infection. Using an in-house ELISA assay the concentration of sMR was analyzed in the serum of patients from three prospective studies. Using Sepsis-3 guidelines, patients were stratified as no infection (NI, n = 68), verified infection without sepsis (NSEP, n = 133) and verified infection with sepsis (SEP, n = 190). Adverse outcome was assessed as death before 28 days. We show that the sensitivity of sMR to predict mortality [area under curve (AUC) = 0.77] exceeded the sensitivity of procalcitonin (PCT, AUC = 0.63), C-reactive protein (CRP, AUC = 0.61) and the macrophage soluble receptor, CD163 (sCD163, AUC = 0.74), while it was less accurate to predict diagnosis of sepsis [AUC(sMR) = 0.69 vs. AUC(PCT) = 0.79, AUC(CRP) = 0.71 and AUC(sCD163) = 0.66]. Median sMR was significantly higher in the group with SEP (0.55 mg/L), compared with the groups without sepsis (NI and NSEP) (0.39 mg/L, p < .0001), and among those who died compared to those who survived (0.89 mg/L vs. 0.44 mg/L, p < .0001). Our results, and the current literature, support further evaluation of sMR as a biomarker of sepsis and mortality among patients hospitalized with suspected infection.",
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author = "{Marie Relster}, Mette and Shahin Gaini and M{\o}ller, {Holger Jon} and {Somuncu Johansen}, Isik and Court Pedersen",
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The macrophage activation marker sMR as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in patients with acute infectious disease with or without sepsis. / Marie Relster, Mette; Gaini, Shahin; Møller, Holger Jon; Somuncu Johansen, Isik; Pedersen, Court.

In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical & Laboratory Investigation, Vol. 78, No. 3, 2018, p. 180-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The macrophage activation marker sMR as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in patients with acute infectious disease with or without sepsis

AU - Marie Relster, Mette

AU - Gaini, Shahin

AU - Møller, Holger Jon

AU - Somuncu Johansen, Isik

AU - Pedersen, Court

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Sepsis is a leading cause of mortality. This study aims to assess the utility of the soluble mannose receptor (sMR) as a biomarker of sepsis and mortality in patients hospitalized with suspected infection. Using an in-house ELISA assay the concentration of sMR was analyzed in the serum of patients from three prospective studies. Using Sepsis-3 guidelines, patients were stratified as no infection (NI, n = 68), verified infection without sepsis (NSEP, n = 133) and verified infection with sepsis (SEP, n = 190). Adverse outcome was assessed as death before 28 days. We show that the sensitivity of sMR to predict mortality [area under curve (AUC) = 0.77] exceeded the sensitivity of procalcitonin (PCT, AUC = 0.63), C-reactive protein (CRP, AUC = 0.61) and the macrophage soluble receptor, CD163 (sCD163, AUC = 0.74), while it was less accurate to predict diagnosis of sepsis [AUC(sMR) = 0.69 vs. AUC(PCT) = 0.79, AUC(CRP) = 0.71 and AUC(sCD163) = 0.66]. Median sMR was significantly higher in the group with SEP (0.55 mg/L), compared with the groups without sepsis (NI and NSEP) (0.39 mg/L, p < .0001), and among those who died compared to those who survived (0.89 mg/L vs. 0.44 mg/L, p < .0001). Our results, and the current literature, support further evaluation of sMR as a biomarker of sepsis and mortality among patients hospitalized with suspected infection.

AB - Sepsis is a leading cause of mortality. This study aims to assess the utility of the soluble mannose receptor (sMR) as a biomarker of sepsis and mortality in patients hospitalized with suspected infection. Using an in-house ELISA assay the concentration of sMR was analyzed in the serum of patients from three prospective studies. Using Sepsis-3 guidelines, patients were stratified as no infection (NI, n = 68), verified infection without sepsis (NSEP, n = 133) and verified infection with sepsis (SEP, n = 190). Adverse outcome was assessed as death before 28 days. We show that the sensitivity of sMR to predict mortality [area under curve (AUC) = 0.77] exceeded the sensitivity of procalcitonin (PCT, AUC = 0.63), C-reactive protein (CRP, AUC = 0.61) and the macrophage soluble receptor, CD163 (sCD163, AUC = 0.74), while it was less accurate to predict diagnosis of sepsis [AUC(sMR) = 0.69 vs. AUC(PCT) = 0.79, AUC(CRP) = 0.71 and AUC(sCD163) = 0.66]. Median sMR was significantly higher in the group with SEP (0.55 mg/L), compared with the groups without sepsis (NI and NSEP) (0.39 mg/L, p < .0001), and among those who died compared to those who survived (0.89 mg/L vs. 0.44 mg/L, p < .0001). Our results, and the current literature, support further evaluation of sMR as a biomarker of sepsis and mortality among patients hospitalized with suspected infection.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1080/00365513.2018.1431841

DO - 10.1080/00365513.2018.1431841

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29383956

VL - 78

SP - 180

EP - 186

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Clinical & Laboratory Investigation

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Clinical & Laboratory Investigation

SN - 0036-5513

IS - 3

ER -