The joint association of musculoskeletal pain and domains of physical activity with sleep problems: cross-sectional data from the DPhacto study, Denmark

Eivind Schjelderup Skarpsno*, Paul Jarle Mork, Tom Ivar Lund Nilsen, Marie Birk Jørgensen, Andreas Holtermann

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate if occupational physical activity (OPA) and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) influence the association between musculoskeletal pain and sleep problems. Methods: Cross-sectional study includes 678 workers in the Danish PHysical ACTivity cohort with Objective measurements (DPhacto). Musculoskeletal pain was assessed by questionnaires, while OPA and LTPA were measured with accelerometers for up to 6 consecutive days. We used logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for self-reported insomnia symptoms and non-restorative sleep. Results: Analyses of the joint association of musculoskeletal pain and OPA showed that workers with high pain and high OPA had ORs of 5.80 (95% CI 2.64–12.67) for insomnia symptoms and 2.50 (95% CI 1.37–4.57) for non-restorative sleep, compared to those with low pain and low OPA, whereas workers with high pain and low OPA had ORs of 4.67 (95% CI 2.17–10.07) for insomnia symptoms, and 2.67 (95% CI 1.46–4.89) for non-restorative sleep, respectively. Furthermore, workers with high pain and high LTPA had ORs of 4.23 (95% CI 2.16–8.32) for insomnia symptoms and 1.95 (95% CI 1.09–3.48) for non-restorative sleep, compared to those with low pain and low LTPA, whereas workers with high pain and low LTPA had ORs of 3.34 (95% CI 1.66–6.70) for insomnia symptoms and 2.14 (95% CI 1.21–3.80) for non-restorative sleep, respectively. Conclusions: Workers with high musculoskeletal pain who also conducted high levels of OPA or LTPA reported higher prevalence of insomnia symptoms.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Volume92
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)491-499
ISSN0340-0131
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1. May 2019

Fingerprint

Denmark
Leisure Activities
Confidence Intervals
Odds Ratio
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Accelerometer
  • Insomnia
  • Physical work exposure
  • Technical measurement
  • Work demands

Cite this

Skarpsno, Eivind Schjelderup ; Mork, Paul Jarle ; Nilsen, Tom Ivar Lund ; Jørgensen, Marie Birk ; Holtermann, Andreas. / The joint association of musculoskeletal pain and domains of physical activity with sleep problems : cross-sectional data from the DPhacto study, Denmark. In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health. 2019 ; Vol. 92, No. 4. pp. 491-499.
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title = "The joint association of musculoskeletal pain and domains of physical activity with sleep problems: cross-sectional data from the DPhacto study, Denmark",
abstract = "Purpose: To investigate if occupational physical activity (OPA) and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) influence the association between musculoskeletal pain and sleep problems. Methods: Cross-sectional study includes 678 workers in the Danish PHysical ACTivity cohort with Objective measurements (DPhacto). Musculoskeletal pain was assessed by questionnaires, while OPA and LTPA were measured with accelerometers for up to 6 consecutive days. We used logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs) for self-reported insomnia symptoms and non-restorative sleep. Results: Analyses of the joint association of musculoskeletal pain and OPA showed that workers with high pain and high OPA had ORs of 5.80 (95{\%} CI 2.64–12.67) for insomnia symptoms and 2.50 (95{\%} CI 1.37–4.57) for non-restorative sleep, compared to those with low pain and low OPA, whereas workers with high pain and low OPA had ORs of 4.67 (95{\%} CI 2.17–10.07) for insomnia symptoms, and 2.67 (95{\%} CI 1.46–4.89) for non-restorative sleep, respectively. Furthermore, workers with high pain and high LTPA had ORs of 4.23 (95{\%} CI 2.16–8.32) for insomnia symptoms and 1.95 (95{\%} CI 1.09–3.48) for non-restorative sleep, compared to those with low pain and low LTPA, whereas workers with high pain and low LTPA had ORs of 3.34 (95{\%} CI 1.66–6.70) for insomnia symptoms and 2.14 (95{\%} CI 1.21–3.80) for non-restorative sleep, respectively. Conclusions: Workers with high musculoskeletal pain who also conducted high levels of OPA or LTPA reported higher prevalence of insomnia symptoms.",
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The joint association of musculoskeletal pain and domains of physical activity with sleep problems : cross-sectional data from the DPhacto study, Denmark. / Skarpsno, Eivind Schjelderup; Mork, Paul Jarle; Nilsen, Tom Ivar Lund; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Holtermann, Andreas.

In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, Vol. 92, No. 4, 01.05.2019, p. 491-499.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The joint association of musculoskeletal pain and domains of physical activity with sleep problems

T2 - cross-sectional data from the DPhacto study, Denmark

AU - Skarpsno, Eivind Schjelderup

AU - Mork, Paul Jarle

AU - Nilsen, Tom Ivar Lund

AU - Jørgensen, Marie Birk

AU - Holtermann, Andreas

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - Purpose: To investigate if occupational physical activity (OPA) and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) influence the association between musculoskeletal pain and sleep problems. Methods: Cross-sectional study includes 678 workers in the Danish PHysical ACTivity cohort with Objective measurements (DPhacto). Musculoskeletal pain was assessed by questionnaires, while OPA and LTPA were measured with accelerometers for up to 6 consecutive days. We used logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for self-reported insomnia symptoms and non-restorative sleep. Results: Analyses of the joint association of musculoskeletal pain and OPA showed that workers with high pain and high OPA had ORs of 5.80 (95% CI 2.64–12.67) for insomnia symptoms and 2.50 (95% CI 1.37–4.57) for non-restorative sleep, compared to those with low pain and low OPA, whereas workers with high pain and low OPA had ORs of 4.67 (95% CI 2.17–10.07) for insomnia symptoms, and 2.67 (95% CI 1.46–4.89) for non-restorative sleep, respectively. Furthermore, workers with high pain and high LTPA had ORs of 4.23 (95% CI 2.16–8.32) for insomnia symptoms and 1.95 (95% CI 1.09–3.48) for non-restorative sleep, compared to those with low pain and low LTPA, whereas workers with high pain and low LTPA had ORs of 3.34 (95% CI 1.66–6.70) for insomnia symptoms and 2.14 (95% CI 1.21–3.80) for non-restorative sleep, respectively. Conclusions: Workers with high musculoskeletal pain who also conducted high levels of OPA or LTPA reported higher prevalence of insomnia symptoms.

AB - Purpose: To investigate if occupational physical activity (OPA) and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) influence the association between musculoskeletal pain and sleep problems. Methods: Cross-sectional study includes 678 workers in the Danish PHysical ACTivity cohort with Objective measurements (DPhacto). Musculoskeletal pain was assessed by questionnaires, while OPA and LTPA were measured with accelerometers for up to 6 consecutive days. We used logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for self-reported insomnia symptoms and non-restorative sleep. Results: Analyses of the joint association of musculoskeletal pain and OPA showed that workers with high pain and high OPA had ORs of 5.80 (95% CI 2.64–12.67) for insomnia symptoms and 2.50 (95% CI 1.37–4.57) for non-restorative sleep, compared to those with low pain and low OPA, whereas workers with high pain and low OPA had ORs of 4.67 (95% CI 2.17–10.07) for insomnia symptoms, and 2.67 (95% CI 1.46–4.89) for non-restorative sleep, respectively. Furthermore, workers with high pain and high LTPA had ORs of 4.23 (95% CI 2.16–8.32) for insomnia symptoms and 1.95 (95% CI 1.09–3.48) for non-restorative sleep, compared to those with low pain and low LTPA, whereas workers with high pain and low LTPA had ORs of 3.34 (95% CI 1.66–6.70) for insomnia symptoms and 2.14 (95% CI 1.21–3.80) for non-restorative sleep, respectively. Conclusions: Workers with high musculoskeletal pain who also conducted high levels of OPA or LTPA reported higher prevalence of insomnia symptoms.

KW - Accelerometer

KW - Insomnia

KW - Physical work exposure

KW - Technical measurement

KW - Work demands

U2 - 10.1007/s00420-018-1382-8

DO - 10.1007/s00420-018-1382-8

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30456459

AN - SCOPUS:85056737522

VL - 92

SP - 491

EP - 499

JO - International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health

JF - International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health

SN - 0340-0131

IS - 4

ER -