The interactions between pain, pain-related fear of movement and productivity

L Sell, H L Lund, A Holtermann, Karen Søgaard

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Employees with physically heavy work have an increased risk of musculoskeletal disorders leading to reduced work ability.

AIMS: To investigate if a high level of musculoskeletal pain or pain-related fear of movement was associated with low productivity among employees with physically heavy work and differing work ability levels.

METHODS: The study was conducted at a Danish production site and employees with physically heavy work in the production line were included in the study. Work ability was assessed with the Work Ability Index (WAI), pain-related fear of movement with the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia and productivity and musculoskeletal pain by self-reported measures. Sickness absence records for construction of WAI were obtained from the workplace.

RESULTS: There was a 77% response rate with 350 employees included in the final analysis. Among employees with only moderate work ability, there was neither an association between pain and productivity nor between pain-related fear of movement and productivity. For employees with good work ability, higher levels of pain and higher levels of pain-related fear of movement both raised the odds of low productivity significantly.

CONCLUSIONS: Despite the fact that musculoskeletal pain increases the risk of reduced work ability significantly, musculoskeletal pain and pain-related fear of movement were associated with low productivity only among employees with good work ability.

Original languageEnglish
JournalOccupational Medicine
Volume64
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)376-81
Number of pages6
ISSN0962-7480
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2014

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Bibliographical note

2014 May 23 [Epub ahead of print]

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Sell, L ; Lund, H L ; Holtermann, A ; Søgaard, Karen. / The interactions between pain, pain-related fear of movement and productivity. In: Occupational Medicine. 2014 ; Vol. 64, No. 5. pp. 376-81.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Employees with physically heavy work have an increased risk of musculoskeletal disorders leading to reduced work ability.AIMS: To investigate if a high level of musculoskeletal pain or pain-related fear of movement was associated with low productivity among employees with physically heavy work and differing work ability levels.METHODS: The study was conducted at a Danish production site and employees with physically heavy work in the production line were included in the study. Work ability was assessed with the Work Ability Index (WAI), pain-related fear of movement with the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia and productivity and musculoskeletal pain by self-reported measures. Sickness absence records for construction of WAI were obtained from the workplace.RESULTS: There was a 77{\%} response rate with 350 employees included in the final analysis. Among employees with only moderate work ability, there was neither an association between pain and productivity nor between pain-related fear of movement and productivity. For employees with good work ability, higher levels of pain and higher levels of pain-related fear of movement both raised the odds of low productivity significantly.CONCLUSIONS: Despite the fact that musculoskeletal pain increases the risk of reduced work ability significantly, musculoskeletal pain and pain-related fear of movement were associated with low productivity only among employees with good work ability.",
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The interactions between pain, pain-related fear of movement and productivity. / Sell, L; Lund, H L; Holtermann, A; Søgaard, Karen.

In: Occupational Medicine, Vol. 64, No. 5, 07.2014, p. 376-81.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - The interactions between pain, pain-related fear of movement and productivity

AU - Sell, L

AU - Lund, H L

AU - Holtermann, A

AU - Søgaard, Karen

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PY - 2014/7

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Employees with physically heavy work have an increased risk of musculoskeletal disorders leading to reduced work ability.AIMS: To investigate if a high level of musculoskeletal pain or pain-related fear of movement was associated with low productivity among employees with physically heavy work and differing work ability levels.METHODS: The study was conducted at a Danish production site and employees with physically heavy work in the production line were included in the study. Work ability was assessed with the Work Ability Index (WAI), pain-related fear of movement with the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia and productivity and musculoskeletal pain by self-reported measures. Sickness absence records for construction of WAI were obtained from the workplace.RESULTS: There was a 77% response rate with 350 employees included in the final analysis. Among employees with only moderate work ability, there was neither an association between pain and productivity nor between pain-related fear of movement and productivity. For employees with good work ability, higher levels of pain and higher levels of pain-related fear of movement both raised the odds of low productivity significantly.CONCLUSIONS: Despite the fact that musculoskeletal pain increases the risk of reduced work ability significantly, musculoskeletal pain and pain-related fear of movement were associated with low productivity only among employees with good work ability.

AB - BACKGROUND: Employees with physically heavy work have an increased risk of musculoskeletal disorders leading to reduced work ability.AIMS: To investigate if a high level of musculoskeletal pain or pain-related fear of movement was associated with low productivity among employees with physically heavy work and differing work ability levels.METHODS: The study was conducted at a Danish production site and employees with physically heavy work in the production line were included in the study. Work ability was assessed with the Work Ability Index (WAI), pain-related fear of movement with the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia and productivity and musculoskeletal pain by self-reported measures. Sickness absence records for construction of WAI were obtained from the workplace.RESULTS: There was a 77% response rate with 350 employees included in the final analysis. Among employees with only moderate work ability, there was neither an association between pain and productivity nor between pain-related fear of movement and productivity. For employees with good work ability, higher levels of pain and higher levels of pain-related fear of movement both raised the odds of low productivity significantly.CONCLUSIONS: Despite the fact that musculoskeletal pain increases the risk of reduced work ability significantly, musculoskeletal pain and pain-related fear of movement were associated with low productivity only among employees with good work ability.

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