The impact of space on teaching: - towards spatial literacy as a pedagogical concept

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPosterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Churchill once said: “We shape the buildings, and then the buildings shape us”, indicating the interplay between space and its occupants. Until now, researching this interplay has concentrated on the design of spaces for a new generation of students according to “new” views on learning (Bennett, 2006; Grummon, 2009; Jamieson, 2003; Laing & Sörö, 2016; Villano, 2010). In this exploratory, small-scale project we set out to explore how teachers are in dialogue with the learning space they are going to use for teaching – that is, how teachers shape the room and how the room then shape their teaching. One way of analysing the complex relationship between space and its occupation is proposed by Lefebvre (1991) in his “spatial triad”. The triad consists of the perceived, the conceived and the lived space as space is not only decided on by architects, but also produced by the way people use it and by the meaning they inscribe on to it. In our context Lefebvre's spatial triad is transformed into the following methodological framework • conceived space - teachers’ sketching their perception of the learning space and analyses of these sketches as to which elements are drawn and in which order. • perceived space - interviews of teachers describing actions and activities that will take place in the learning space • lived space – observational studies of how teaching proceeds focusing on how teachers and students use the learning space in a teaching situation Ten teachers at a university in Denmark are selected for interviews and observation of their teaching sessions. All teachers teaches in smaller learning spaces with room for up to 80-90 persons with a variation in furniture (for example group tables, no tables, horse shoe, fixed rows of tables,…). Each teacher is interviewed about their conception and perception of the space and observed while teaching in the space. The interview and observations have not yet been analysed, but our hypothesis is that the teachers’ pedagogical considerations on space can be described as spatial literacy, meaning that understanding of how to effectively use learning spaces be defined by a specific taxonomy.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date25. Oct 2018
Publication statusPublished - 25. Oct 2018
EventISSOTL Toward a learning culture - University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
Duration: 23. Oct 201827. Oct 2018
https://www.issotl.com/issotl-2018-call-proposals

Conference

ConferenceISSOTL Toward a learning culture
LocationUniversity of Bergen
CountryNorway
CityBergen
Period23/10/201827/10/2018
Internet address

Cite this

Troelsen, R. (2018). The impact of space on teaching: - towards spatial literacy as a pedagogical concept. Poster session presented at ISSOTL Toward a learning culture, Bergen, Norway.
Troelsen, Rie. / The impact of space on teaching : - towards spatial literacy as a pedagogical concept. Poster session presented at ISSOTL Toward a learning culture, Bergen, Norway.
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title = "The impact of space on teaching: - towards spatial literacy as a pedagogical concept",
abstract = "Churchill once said: “We shape the buildings, and then the buildings shape us”, indicating the interplay between space and its occupants. Until now, researching this interplay has concentrated on the design of spaces for a new generation of students according to “new” views on learning (Bennett, 2006; Grummon, 2009; Jamieson, 2003; Laing & S{\"o}r{\"o}, 2016; Villano, 2010). In this exploratory, small-scale project we set out to explore how teachers are in dialogue with the learning space they are going to use for teaching – that is, how teachers shape the room and how the room then shape their teaching. One way of analysing the complex relationship between space and its occupation is proposed by Lefebvre (1991) in his “spatial triad”. The triad consists of the perceived, the conceived and the lived space as space is not only decided on by architects, but also produced by the way people use it and by the meaning they inscribe on to it. In our context Lefebvre's spatial triad is transformed into the following methodological framework • conceived space - teachers’ sketching their perception of the learning space and analyses of these sketches as to which elements are drawn and in which order. • perceived space - interviews of teachers describing actions and activities that will take place in the learning space • lived space – observational studies of how teaching proceeds focusing on how teachers and students use the learning space in a teaching situation Ten teachers at a university in Denmark are selected for interviews and observation of their teaching sessions. All teachers teaches in smaller learning spaces with room for up to 80-90 persons with a variation in furniture (for example group tables, no tables, horse shoe, fixed rows of tables,…). Each teacher is interviewed about their conception and perception of the space and observed while teaching in the space. The interview and observations have not yet been analysed, but our hypothesis is that the teachers’ pedagogical considerations on space can be described as spatial literacy, meaning that understanding of how to effectively use learning spaces be defined by a specific taxonomy.",
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year = "2018",
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day = "25",
language = "English",
note = "ISSOTL Toward a learning culture ; Conference date: 23-10-2018 Through 27-10-2018",
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Troelsen, R 2018, 'The impact of space on teaching: - towards spatial literacy as a pedagogical concept', ISSOTL Toward a learning culture, Bergen, Norway, 23/10/2018 - 27/10/2018.

The impact of space on teaching : - towards spatial literacy as a pedagogical concept. / Troelsen, Rie.

2018. Poster session presented at ISSOTL Toward a learning culture, Bergen, Norway.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPosterResearchpeer-review

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AB - Churchill once said: “We shape the buildings, and then the buildings shape us”, indicating the interplay between space and its occupants. Until now, researching this interplay has concentrated on the design of spaces for a new generation of students according to “new” views on learning (Bennett, 2006; Grummon, 2009; Jamieson, 2003; Laing & Sörö, 2016; Villano, 2010). In this exploratory, small-scale project we set out to explore how teachers are in dialogue with the learning space they are going to use for teaching – that is, how teachers shape the room and how the room then shape their teaching. One way of analysing the complex relationship between space and its occupation is proposed by Lefebvre (1991) in his “spatial triad”. The triad consists of the perceived, the conceived and the lived space as space is not only decided on by architects, but also produced by the way people use it and by the meaning they inscribe on to it. In our context Lefebvre's spatial triad is transformed into the following methodological framework • conceived space - teachers’ sketching their perception of the learning space and analyses of these sketches as to which elements are drawn and in which order. • perceived space - interviews of teachers describing actions and activities that will take place in the learning space • lived space – observational studies of how teaching proceeds focusing on how teachers and students use the learning space in a teaching situation Ten teachers at a university in Denmark are selected for interviews and observation of their teaching sessions. All teachers teaches in smaller learning spaces with room for up to 80-90 persons with a variation in furniture (for example group tables, no tables, horse shoe, fixed rows of tables,…). Each teacher is interviewed about their conception and perception of the space and observed while teaching in the space. The interview and observations have not yet been analysed, but our hypothesis is that the teachers’ pedagogical considerations on space can be described as spatial literacy, meaning that understanding of how to effectively use learning spaces be defined by a specific taxonomy.

M3 - Poster

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Troelsen R. The impact of space on teaching: - towards spatial literacy as a pedagogical concept. 2018. Poster session presented at ISSOTL Toward a learning culture, Bergen, Norway.