The @Home project

Ian Robert Coxon

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPosterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

With the future picture of healthcare being shaped by an aging population with more complex and chronic illnesses the health care system is currently overloaded and it has been proposed (at least in Denmark) to increasingly move towards outpatient solutions. This runs the risk of losing therapeutic as well as unspecifiable efficacious values in warm-hands interactions currently valued in the hospital based system, replacing them with cold hands approaches provided by new remote monitoring, remote care and tele-medicine based technologies. The focus on the experience of patient health runs the risk of being overshadowed by what is increasingly seen as new (and substantial) pharmacological and health equipment business market opportunities in what is now viewed as a health 'industry'.
The Centre for Innovation at Mayo Clinic (CFI) in Rochester USA, has conducted many projects which border on and have investigated various aspects of care provision and patient experience within a patient's home environment. Considerable work by other researchers inside and outside the health field has also contributed insights and platforms for moving healthcare in this direction. In most areas of the western world, the healthcare sector is struggling to cope with the scale of strain that shifting demographics, rising costs and increasing chronic/complex care is placing on the health system. The shift towards home based care and personal health self-management is seen as offering some possibilities to alleviate an overburdened and failing system.
Even considering cultural and size differences, Denmark also faces these challenges but is at a point that can be considered to have progressed further along this path than in the USA. Since 2012, a major reform program has been under way within the Danish health system aimed at establishing 'Super-hospitals' to replace smaller regional facilities. This revolutionary change is expected to be achieved by reducing both the number and duration of patient stays in hospitals. Realising this goal demands a heavy reliance on welfare technology solutions currently being developed (cyber-care, remote care, tele-medicine, remote monitoring, embedded sensors, robotic and technology-based rehabilitation etc.). The assumption behind most of these technology solutions is that they will facilitate or enable outpatient self-management (self-care) and home-care as an extension of existing and currently proposed clinical services and products. This assumption is influenced by political and economic interests and it has failed in most part to understand or in many cases even to consider the patient 'experience of care' within the sovereignty of the home.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date2014
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Health
Denmark
Home Care Services
Delivery of Health Care
Outpatients
Medicine
Western World
Health Care Sector
Robotics
Length of Stay
Research Personnel
Equipment and Supplies
Population

Cite this

Coxon, I. R. (2014). The @Home project.
Coxon, Ian Robert. / The @Home project.
@conference{bd3a7b12d28d45babf4db28b49c8b8d7,
title = "The @Home project",
abstract = "With the future picture of healthcare being shaped by an aging population with more complex and chronic illnesses the health care system is currently overloaded and it has been proposed (at least in Denmark) to increasingly move towards outpatient solutions. This runs the risk of losing therapeutic as well as unspecifiable efficacious values in warm-hands interactions currently valued in the hospital based system, replacing them with cold hands approaches provided by new remote monitoring, remote care and tele-medicine based technologies. The focus on the experience of patient health runs the risk of being overshadowed by what is increasingly seen as new (and substantial) pharmacological and health equipment business market opportunities in what is now viewed as a health 'industry'.The Centre for Innovation at Mayo Clinic (CFI) in Rochester USA, has conducted many projects which border on and have investigated various aspects of care provision and patient experience within a patient's home environment. Considerable work by other researchers inside and outside the health field has also contributed insights and platforms for moving healthcare in this direction. In most areas of the western world, the healthcare sector is struggling to cope with the scale of strain that shifting demographics, rising costs and increasing chronic/complex care is placing on the health system. The shift towards home based care and personal health self-management is seen as offering some possibilities to alleviate an overburdened and failing system. Even considering cultural and size differences, Denmark also faces these challenges but is at a point that can be considered to have progressed further along this path than in the USA. Since 2012, a major reform program has been under way within the Danish health system aimed at establishing 'Super-hospitals' to replace smaller regional facilities. This revolutionary change is expected to be achieved by reducing both the number and duration of patient stays in hospitals. Realising this goal demands a heavy reliance on welfare technology solutions currently being developed (cyber-care, remote care, tele-medicine, remote monitoring, embedded sensors, robotic and technology-based rehabilitation etc.). The assumption behind most of these technology solutions is that they will facilitate or enable outpatient self-management (self-care) and home-care as an extension of existing and currently proposed clinical services and products. This assumption is influenced by political and economic interests and it has failed in most part to understand or in many cases even to consider the patient 'experience of care' within the sovereignty of the home.",
author = "Coxon, {Ian Robert}",
note = "Presentation: The @Home project, Poster presentation at Designing Self-care for Everyday Life, NordiCHI, October, 2014",
year = "2014",
language = "English",

}

Coxon, IR 2014, 'The @Home project'.

The @Home project. / Coxon, Ian Robert.

2014.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPosterResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - The @Home project

AU - Coxon, Ian Robert

N1 - Presentation: The @Home project, Poster presentation at Designing Self-care for Everyday Life, NordiCHI, October, 2014

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - With the future picture of healthcare being shaped by an aging population with more complex and chronic illnesses the health care system is currently overloaded and it has been proposed (at least in Denmark) to increasingly move towards outpatient solutions. This runs the risk of losing therapeutic as well as unspecifiable efficacious values in warm-hands interactions currently valued in the hospital based system, replacing them with cold hands approaches provided by new remote monitoring, remote care and tele-medicine based technologies. The focus on the experience of patient health runs the risk of being overshadowed by what is increasingly seen as new (and substantial) pharmacological and health equipment business market opportunities in what is now viewed as a health 'industry'.The Centre for Innovation at Mayo Clinic (CFI) in Rochester USA, has conducted many projects which border on and have investigated various aspects of care provision and patient experience within a patient's home environment. Considerable work by other researchers inside and outside the health field has also contributed insights and platforms for moving healthcare in this direction. In most areas of the western world, the healthcare sector is struggling to cope with the scale of strain that shifting demographics, rising costs and increasing chronic/complex care is placing on the health system. The shift towards home based care and personal health self-management is seen as offering some possibilities to alleviate an overburdened and failing system. Even considering cultural and size differences, Denmark also faces these challenges but is at a point that can be considered to have progressed further along this path than in the USA. Since 2012, a major reform program has been under way within the Danish health system aimed at establishing 'Super-hospitals' to replace smaller regional facilities. This revolutionary change is expected to be achieved by reducing both the number and duration of patient stays in hospitals. Realising this goal demands a heavy reliance on welfare technology solutions currently being developed (cyber-care, remote care, tele-medicine, remote monitoring, embedded sensors, robotic and technology-based rehabilitation etc.). The assumption behind most of these technology solutions is that they will facilitate or enable outpatient self-management (self-care) and home-care as an extension of existing and currently proposed clinical services and products. This assumption is influenced by political and economic interests and it has failed in most part to understand or in many cases even to consider the patient 'experience of care' within the sovereignty of the home.

AB - With the future picture of healthcare being shaped by an aging population with more complex and chronic illnesses the health care system is currently overloaded and it has been proposed (at least in Denmark) to increasingly move towards outpatient solutions. This runs the risk of losing therapeutic as well as unspecifiable efficacious values in warm-hands interactions currently valued in the hospital based system, replacing them with cold hands approaches provided by new remote monitoring, remote care and tele-medicine based technologies. The focus on the experience of patient health runs the risk of being overshadowed by what is increasingly seen as new (and substantial) pharmacological and health equipment business market opportunities in what is now viewed as a health 'industry'.The Centre for Innovation at Mayo Clinic (CFI) in Rochester USA, has conducted many projects which border on and have investigated various aspects of care provision and patient experience within a patient's home environment. Considerable work by other researchers inside and outside the health field has also contributed insights and platforms for moving healthcare in this direction. In most areas of the western world, the healthcare sector is struggling to cope with the scale of strain that shifting demographics, rising costs and increasing chronic/complex care is placing on the health system. The shift towards home based care and personal health self-management is seen as offering some possibilities to alleviate an overburdened and failing system. Even considering cultural and size differences, Denmark also faces these challenges but is at a point that can be considered to have progressed further along this path than in the USA. Since 2012, a major reform program has been under way within the Danish health system aimed at establishing 'Super-hospitals' to replace smaller regional facilities. This revolutionary change is expected to be achieved by reducing both the number and duration of patient stays in hospitals. Realising this goal demands a heavy reliance on welfare technology solutions currently being developed (cyber-care, remote care, tele-medicine, remote monitoring, embedded sensors, robotic and technology-based rehabilitation etc.). The assumption behind most of these technology solutions is that they will facilitate or enable outpatient self-management (self-care) and home-care as an extension of existing and currently proposed clinical services and products. This assumption is influenced by political and economic interests and it has failed in most part to understand or in many cases even to consider the patient 'experience of care' within the sovereignty of the home.

M3 - Poster

ER -

Coxon IR. The @Home project. 2014.