The effect of occupational lifting on hypertension risk: Protocol for a project using data from the copenhagen city heart study

Mette Korshøj*, Harald Hannerz, Jacob Louis Marott, Peter Schnohr, Eva Irene Bossano Prescott, Els Clays, Andreas Holtermann

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Background: Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is responsible for 14% of all annual deaths globally. The prevalence of hypertension varies across occupational groups, possibly affected by differences in the working environment. One work-related factor that might impose a risk for hypertension is lifting due to the acute large increases in blood pressure (BP) during lifting. Objective: The aim of this study is to explore associations between heavy occupational lifting and hypertension in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. Methods: This study will use data from the third, fourth, and fifth examination of the Copenhagen City Heart Study. The dataset contains person-based information on health as well as a large variety of biological, environmental, and lifestyle-related factors. Using a cross-sectional design, we will investigate the association between heavy occupational lifting and hypertension, defined as using antihypertensive drugs or having a measured systolic BP (SBP) =140 mm Hg or diastolic BP (DBP) =90 mm Hg. Furthermore, in a prospective design, we will investigate the association between heavy occupational lifting and risk of becoming an SBP case, defined as the shift from not using antihypertensive drugs in examination n to use of antihypertensive drugs in examination n+1 or an above median delta value of SBP (SBP in examination n+1-SBP in examination n). Results: In the third examination in 1991-1994, 10,135 out of 16,560 participants attended (61.20%), in the fourth examination in 2001-2003, 6237 out of 12,599 participants attended (49.50%), and in the fifth examination in 2011-2015, 4550 out of 9765 participants attended (46.59%). On the basis of the inclusion criteria of answering to the level of occupational physical activity, 5031 observations were excluded from examination 3, 2600 from examination 4, and 1621 from examination 5. Hence, the final populations for the cross-sectional and prospective analysis are assumed to include less than 7166 participants in the cross-sectional analysis and less than 1850 participants in the prospective analysis due to the additional inclusion criteria of measured BP and use of antihypertensive drugs. Conclusions: One-third of the workforce in Europe reports to carry or move heavy loads regularly during working hours (6th survey in Eurofound). Thus, if this study shows occupational lifting to increase the risk for hypertension, the prevention for hypertension can be improved.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere93
JournalJournal of Medical Internet Research
Volume7
Issue number4
ISSN1439-4456
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27. Apr 2018

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Cross-Sectional Studies
Occupational Groups
Health
Population
Datasets
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Blue collar
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Cohort study
  • Copenhagen City Heart Study
  • Heavy lifting
  • Manual handling
  • Occupational epidemiology
  • Occupational exposure

Cite this

Korshøj, Mette ; Hannerz, Harald ; Marott, Jacob Louis ; Schnohr, Peter ; Prescott, Eva Irene Bossano ; Clays, Els ; Holtermann, Andreas. / The effect of occupational lifting on hypertension risk : Protocol for a project using data from the copenhagen city heart study. In: Journal of Medical Internet Research. 2018 ; Vol. 7, No. 4.
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title = "The effect of occupational lifting on hypertension risk: Protocol for a project using data from the copenhagen city heart study",
abstract = "Background: Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is responsible for 14{\%} of all annual deaths globally. The prevalence of hypertension varies across occupational groups, possibly affected by differences in the working environment. One work-related factor that might impose a risk for hypertension is lifting due to the acute large increases in blood pressure (BP) during lifting. Objective: The aim of this study is to explore associations between heavy occupational lifting and hypertension in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. Methods: This study will use data from the third, fourth, and fifth examination of the Copenhagen City Heart Study. The dataset contains person-based information on health as well as a large variety of biological, environmental, and lifestyle-related factors. Using a cross-sectional design, we will investigate the association between heavy occupational lifting and hypertension, defined as using antihypertensive drugs or having a measured systolic BP (SBP) =140 mm Hg or diastolic BP (DBP) =90 mm Hg. Furthermore, in a prospective design, we will investigate the association between heavy occupational lifting and risk of becoming an SBP case, defined as the shift from not using antihypertensive drugs in examination n to use of antihypertensive drugs in examination n+1 or an above median delta value of SBP (SBP in examination n+1-SBP in examination n). Results: In the third examination in 1991-1994, 10,135 out of 16,560 participants attended (61.20{\%}), in the fourth examination in 2001-2003, 6237 out of 12,599 participants attended (49.50{\%}), and in the fifth examination in 2011-2015, 4550 out of 9765 participants attended (46.59{\%}). On the basis of the inclusion criteria of answering to the level of occupational physical activity, 5031 observations were excluded from examination 3, 2600 from examination 4, and 1621 from examination 5. Hence, the final populations for the cross-sectional and prospective analysis are assumed to include less than 7166 participants in the cross-sectional analysis and less than 1850 participants in the prospective analysis due to the additional inclusion criteria of measured BP and use of antihypertensive drugs. Conclusions: One-third of the workforce in Europe reports to carry or move heavy loads regularly during working hours (6th survey in Eurofound). Thus, if this study shows occupational lifting to increase the risk for hypertension, the prevention for hypertension can be improved.",
keywords = "Blood pressure, Blue collar, Cardiovascular diseases, Cohort study, Copenhagen City Heart Study, Heavy lifting, Manual handling, Occupational epidemiology, Occupational exposure",
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The effect of occupational lifting on hypertension risk : Protocol for a project using data from the copenhagen city heart study. / Korshøj, Mette; Hannerz, Harald; Marott, Jacob Louis; Schnohr, Peter; Prescott, Eva Irene Bossano; Clays, Els; Holtermann, Andreas.

In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, Vol. 7, No. 4, e93, 27.04.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of occupational lifting on hypertension risk

T2 - Protocol for a project using data from the copenhagen city heart study

AU - Korshøj, Mette

AU - Hannerz, Harald

AU - Marott, Jacob Louis

AU - Schnohr, Peter

AU - Prescott, Eva Irene Bossano

AU - Clays, Els

AU - Holtermann, Andreas

PY - 2018/4/27

Y1 - 2018/4/27

N2 - Background: Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is responsible for 14% of all annual deaths globally. The prevalence of hypertension varies across occupational groups, possibly affected by differences in the working environment. One work-related factor that might impose a risk for hypertension is lifting due to the acute large increases in blood pressure (BP) during lifting. Objective: The aim of this study is to explore associations between heavy occupational lifting and hypertension in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. Methods: This study will use data from the third, fourth, and fifth examination of the Copenhagen City Heart Study. The dataset contains person-based information on health as well as a large variety of biological, environmental, and lifestyle-related factors. Using a cross-sectional design, we will investigate the association between heavy occupational lifting and hypertension, defined as using antihypertensive drugs or having a measured systolic BP (SBP) =140 mm Hg or diastolic BP (DBP) =90 mm Hg. Furthermore, in a prospective design, we will investigate the association between heavy occupational lifting and risk of becoming an SBP case, defined as the shift from not using antihypertensive drugs in examination n to use of antihypertensive drugs in examination n+1 or an above median delta value of SBP (SBP in examination n+1-SBP in examination n). Results: In the third examination in 1991-1994, 10,135 out of 16,560 participants attended (61.20%), in the fourth examination in 2001-2003, 6237 out of 12,599 participants attended (49.50%), and in the fifth examination in 2011-2015, 4550 out of 9765 participants attended (46.59%). On the basis of the inclusion criteria of answering to the level of occupational physical activity, 5031 observations were excluded from examination 3, 2600 from examination 4, and 1621 from examination 5. Hence, the final populations for the cross-sectional and prospective analysis are assumed to include less than 7166 participants in the cross-sectional analysis and less than 1850 participants in the prospective analysis due to the additional inclusion criteria of measured BP and use of antihypertensive drugs. Conclusions: One-third of the workforce in Europe reports to carry or move heavy loads regularly during working hours (6th survey in Eurofound). Thus, if this study shows occupational lifting to increase the risk for hypertension, the prevention for hypertension can be improved.

AB - Background: Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is responsible for 14% of all annual deaths globally. The prevalence of hypertension varies across occupational groups, possibly affected by differences in the working environment. One work-related factor that might impose a risk for hypertension is lifting due to the acute large increases in blood pressure (BP) during lifting. Objective: The aim of this study is to explore associations between heavy occupational lifting and hypertension in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. Methods: This study will use data from the third, fourth, and fifth examination of the Copenhagen City Heart Study. The dataset contains person-based information on health as well as a large variety of biological, environmental, and lifestyle-related factors. Using a cross-sectional design, we will investigate the association between heavy occupational lifting and hypertension, defined as using antihypertensive drugs or having a measured systolic BP (SBP) =140 mm Hg or diastolic BP (DBP) =90 mm Hg. Furthermore, in a prospective design, we will investigate the association between heavy occupational lifting and risk of becoming an SBP case, defined as the shift from not using antihypertensive drugs in examination n to use of antihypertensive drugs in examination n+1 or an above median delta value of SBP (SBP in examination n+1-SBP in examination n). Results: In the third examination in 1991-1994, 10,135 out of 16,560 participants attended (61.20%), in the fourth examination in 2001-2003, 6237 out of 12,599 participants attended (49.50%), and in the fifth examination in 2011-2015, 4550 out of 9765 participants attended (46.59%). On the basis of the inclusion criteria of answering to the level of occupational physical activity, 5031 observations were excluded from examination 3, 2600 from examination 4, and 1621 from examination 5. Hence, the final populations for the cross-sectional and prospective analysis are assumed to include less than 7166 participants in the cross-sectional analysis and less than 1850 participants in the prospective analysis due to the additional inclusion criteria of measured BP and use of antihypertensive drugs. Conclusions: One-third of the workforce in Europe reports to carry or move heavy loads regularly during working hours (6th survey in Eurofound). Thus, if this study shows occupational lifting to increase the risk for hypertension, the prevention for hypertension can be improved.

KW - Blood pressure

KW - Blue collar

KW - Cardiovascular diseases

KW - Cohort study

KW - Copenhagen City Heart Study

KW - Heavy lifting

KW - Manual handling

KW - Occupational epidemiology

KW - Occupational exposure

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