The daily risk of bacteremia during hospitalization and associated 30-day mortality evaluated in relation to the traditional classification of bacteremia

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: We investigated the overall and daily incidence of bacteremia among hospitalized patients and evaluated the traditional classification of bacteremia (community-onset vs nosocomial based on a 48-hour time window) by means of the daily incidence and associated 30-day mortality.

METHODS: In a multicenter hospital-based cohort study, we included all patients aged 15 years or older admitted to hospitals in Funen County, Denmark, during 2000-2008, and identified all first bacteremias per admission. We calculated the overall incidence of bacteremia per 1,000 admissions and 10,000 bed-days, as well as the daily incidence of bacteremia per 10,000 bed-days and associated 30-day mortality.

RESULTS: We included 724,339 admissions and 10,281 bacteremias for an overall incidence of 14.2 per 1,000 admissions and 23.6 per 10,000 bed-days. The daily incidence was highest on the first 2 days of admission followed by lower incidences that were constant beyond day 12, but varied according to patient and epidemiologic characteristics. Thirty-day mortality for patients with bacteremia was 18% on day 1, 21% on day 2, and between 25% and 35% thereafter.

CONCLUSIONS: Hospitalized patients were at the highest risk of bacteremia during the first 2 days followed by lower incidences that were constant beyond day 12. Thirty-day mortality was 18%-21% for patients with bacteremia on the first 2 days and 25%-35% thereafter. Our findings support the traditional classification of bacteremia.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume44
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)167-172
ISSN0196-6553
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1. Feb 2016

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Denmark
Cohort Studies

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@article{27ca88131eb042e6a90f9ddccfa35268,
title = "The daily risk of bacteremia during hospitalization and associated 30-day mortality evaluated in relation to the traditional classification of bacteremia",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: We investigated the overall and daily incidence of bacteremia among hospitalized patients and evaluated the traditional classification of bacteremia (community-onset vs nosocomial based on a 48-hour time window) by means of the daily incidence and associated 30-day mortality.METHODS: In a multicenter hospital-based cohort study, we included all patients aged 15 years or older admitted to hospitals in Funen County, Denmark, during 2000-2008, and identified all first bacteremias per admission. We calculated the overall incidence of bacteremia per 1,000 admissions and 10,000 bed-days, as well as the daily incidence of bacteremia per 10,000 bed-days and associated 30-day mortality.RESULTS: We included 724,339 admissions and 10,281 bacteremias for an overall incidence of 14.2 per 1,000 admissions and 23.6 per 10,000 bed-days. The daily incidence was highest on the first 2 days of admission followed by lower incidences that were constant beyond day 12, but varied according to patient and epidemiologic characteristics. Thirty-day mortality for patients with bacteremia was 18{\%} on day 1, 21{\%} on day 2, and between 25{\%} and 35{\%} thereafter.CONCLUSIONS: Hospitalized patients were at the highest risk of bacteremia during the first 2 days followed by lower incidences that were constant beyond day 12. Thirty-day mortality was 18{\%}-21{\%} for patients with bacteremia on the first 2 days and 25{\%}-35{\%} thereafter. Our findings support the traditional classification of bacteremia.",
author = "Nielsen, {Stig L{\o}nberg} and Lassen, {Annmarie Touborg} and Kolmos, {Hans J{\o}rn} and Jensen, {Th{\o}ger Gorm} and Gradel, {Kim Oren} and Court Pedersen",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2016",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ajic.2015.09.011",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "167--172",
journal = "American Journal of Infection Control",
issn = "0196-6553",
publisher = "Mosby, Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The daily risk of bacteremia during hospitalization and associated 30-day mortality evaluated in relation to the traditional classification of bacteremia

AU - Nielsen, Stig Lønberg

AU - Lassen, Annmarie Touborg

AU - Kolmos, Hans Jørn

AU - Jensen, Thøger Gorm

AU - Gradel, Kim Oren

AU - Pedersen, Court

N1 - Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2016/2/1

Y1 - 2016/2/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: We investigated the overall and daily incidence of bacteremia among hospitalized patients and evaluated the traditional classification of bacteremia (community-onset vs nosocomial based on a 48-hour time window) by means of the daily incidence and associated 30-day mortality.METHODS: In a multicenter hospital-based cohort study, we included all patients aged 15 years or older admitted to hospitals in Funen County, Denmark, during 2000-2008, and identified all first bacteremias per admission. We calculated the overall incidence of bacteremia per 1,000 admissions and 10,000 bed-days, as well as the daily incidence of bacteremia per 10,000 bed-days and associated 30-day mortality.RESULTS: We included 724,339 admissions and 10,281 bacteremias for an overall incidence of 14.2 per 1,000 admissions and 23.6 per 10,000 bed-days. The daily incidence was highest on the first 2 days of admission followed by lower incidences that were constant beyond day 12, but varied according to patient and epidemiologic characteristics. Thirty-day mortality for patients with bacteremia was 18% on day 1, 21% on day 2, and between 25% and 35% thereafter.CONCLUSIONS: Hospitalized patients were at the highest risk of bacteremia during the first 2 days followed by lower incidences that were constant beyond day 12. Thirty-day mortality was 18%-21% for patients with bacteremia on the first 2 days and 25%-35% thereafter. Our findings support the traditional classification of bacteremia.

AB - BACKGROUND: We investigated the overall and daily incidence of bacteremia among hospitalized patients and evaluated the traditional classification of bacteremia (community-onset vs nosocomial based on a 48-hour time window) by means of the daily incidence and associated 30-day mortality.METHODS: In a multicenter hospital-based cohort study, we included all patients aged 15 years or older admitted to hospitals in Funen County, Denmark, during 2000-2008, and identified all first bacteremias per admission. We calculated the overall incidence of bacteremia per 1,000 admissions and 10,000 bed-days, as well as the daily incidence of bacteremia per 10,000 bed-days and associated 30-day mortality.RESULTS: We included 724,339 admissions and 10,281 bacteremias for an overall incidence of 14.2 per 1,000 admissions and 23.6 per 10,000 bed-days. The daily incidence was highest on the first 2 days of admission followed by lower incidences that were constant beyond day 12, but varied according to patient and epidemiologic characteristics. Thirty-day mortality for patients with bacteremia was 18% on day 1, 21% on day 2, and between 25% and 35% thereafter.CONCLUSIONS: Hospitalized patients were at the highest risk of bacteremia during the first 2 days followed by lower incidences that were constant beyond day 12. Thirty-day mortality was 18%-21% for patients with bacteremia on the first 2 days and 25%-35% thereafter. Our findings support the traditional classification of bacteremia.

U2 - 10.1016/j.ajic.2015.09.011

DO - 10.1016/j.ajic.2015.09.011

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 26577629

VL - 44

SP - 167

EP - 172

JO - American Journal of Infection Control

JF - American Journal of Infection Control

SN - 0196-6553

IS - 2

ER -