The association between a lifetime history of a neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and future neck pain: a population-based cohort study

Paul S Nolet, Pierre Côté, J. David Cassidy, Linda J Carroll

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The objective of this population-based cohort study was to investigate the association between a lifetime history of neck injury from a motor vehicle collision and the development of troublesome neck pain. The current evidence suggests that individuals with a history of neck injury in a traffic collision are more likely to experience future neck pain. However, these results may suffer from residual confounding. Therefore, there is a need to test this association in a large population-based cohort with adequate control of known confounders. We formed a cohort of 919 randomly sampled Saskatchewan adults with no or mild neck pain in September 1995. At baseline, participants were asked if they ever injured their neck in a motor vehicle collision. Six and twelve months later, we asked about the presence of troublesome neck pain (grade II-IV) on the chronic pain grade questionnaire. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate the association between a lifetime history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and the onset of troublesome neck pain while controlling for known confounders. The follow-up rate was 73.5% (676/919) at 6 months and 63.1% (580/919) at 1 year. We found a positive association between a history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and the onset of troublesome neck pain after controlling for bodily pain and body mass index (adjusted HRR = 2.14; 95% CI 1.12-4.10). Our analysis suggests that a history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision is a risk factor for developing future troublesome neck pain. The consequences of a neck injury in a motor vehicle collision can have long lasting effects and predispose individuals to experience recurrent episodes of neck pain.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Spine Journal
Volume19
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)972-81
Number of pages10
ISSN0940-6719
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1. Jun 2010

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Neck Injuries
Neck Pain
Motor Vehicles
Cohort Studies
Population
Saskatchewan
Chronic Pain
Body Mass Index

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title = "The association between a lifetime history of a neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and future neck pain: a population-based cohort study",
abstract = "The objective of this population-based cohort study was to investigate the association between a lifetime history of neck injury from a motor vehicle collision and the development of troublesome neck pain. The current evidence suggests that individuals with a history of neck injury in a traffic collision are more likely to experience future neck pain. However, these results may suffer from residual confounding. Therefore, there is a need to test this association in a large population-based cohort with adequate control of known confounders. We formed a cohort of 919 randomly sampled Saskatchewan adults with no or mild neck pain in September 1995. At baseline, participants were asked if they ever injured their neck in a motor vehicle collision. Six and twelve months later, we asked about the presence of troublesome neck pain (grade II-IV) on the chronic pain grade questionnaire. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate the association between a lifetime history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and the onset of troublesome neck pain while controlling for known confounders. The follow-up rate was 73.5{\%} (676/919) at 6 months and 63.1{\%} (580/919) at 1 year. We found a positive association between a history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and the onset of troublesome neck pain after controlling for bodily pain and body mass index (adjusted HRR = 2.14; 95{\%} CI 1.12-4.10). Our analysis suggests that a history of neck injury in a motor vehicle collision is a risk factor for developing future troublesome neck pain. The consequences of a neck injury in a motor vehicle collision can have long lasting effects and predispose individuals to experience recurrent episodes of neck pain.",
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The association between a lifetime history of a neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and future neck pain: a population-based cohort study. / Nolet, Paul S; Côté, Pierre; Cassidy, J. David; Carroll, Linda J.

In: European Spine Journal, Vol. 19, No. 6, 01.06.2010, p. 972-81.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The association between a lifetime history of a neck injury in a motor vehicle collision and future neck pain: a population-based cohort study

AU - Nolet, Paul S

AU - Côté, Pierre

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