The 10x5 metre shuttle run test may be a good predictor of aerobic performance in pre-pubertal children

Christina Christiansen, Mette Petersen, Karsten Froberg, Lone Hansen, Niels Wedderkopp

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPosterResearch

Abstract

Introduction: It is well known that low fitness increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in children and adolescents. In addition, studies show that CVD risk factors in children and adolescents track into adulthood (1), which makes monitoring changes in fitness in children during their growth and development important in order to intervene if levels decline. Tests that easily can be conducted in school settings are therefore of great importance. Several laboratory-based studies conducted in children show a positive correlation between aerobic and anaerobic performance. Bar-Or suggested that children, especially pre-pubescent, are metabolic non-specialists. Several laboratory-based studies shows that children, who perform above average in anaerobic performance tests, also possess high maximal O2 uptake (2,3). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the performance in two field tests, the short shuttle run test (SSRT), 10x5 m measuring agility and speed , and the long modified 20 metre shuttle run, the Andersen test (AT) measuring cardio-respiratory fitness (4), representing anaerob and aerob performance respectively. Methods: The population and data was collected from “The Childhood Health Activity and Motor Performance School Study”, a 3-year controlled intervention study in public schools in the municipality of Svendborg, Denmark. Ten Schools with in all 1080 primary school children participated in this study, 515 males and 565 females, 8.4 years of age (±1.44 SD range 5.6-11.3), having completed both the short shuttle run and the Andersen test at baseline. Results: Data were analyzed using STATA® (version 10). The association between the performance in the SSRT and the AT was calculated from multiple linear regressions with robust standard errors, to adjust for potential modifying variables. Gender and grade level were found to be possible effect modulators, suggesting several models to be more accurate for the association between the SSRT and the AT. The association of the two tests was highly significant. Discussion: The use of the SSRT as a predictor of aerobic performance, expressed as VO2max, is still to be fully determined. Even though the association between the SSRT and the AT is highly significant, the AT test is only an indirect measure of aerobic performance. This might affect the strength of the validity between the performance in the SSRT and the true expression of aerobic performance. However the association between the running distance in the AT and VO2max measured on the treadmill has previously shown a correlation of r=0.68 for children aged 9.9-11.0 years old (4). The SSRT remains to be validated against anaerobic measurements. Conclusion: The SSRT may provide scientists, teachers and health care professionals with an important tool to estimate physical fitness in children in an easy, non-expensive, fast and fun way in the future.
References:
1. Andersen LB, et Al. Secular trends in physical fitness in Danish adol.. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2009.
2. Bar-Or O & Inbar O. Relationships among anaerobic capacity, sprint and middle distance running of school children. In Shephard, RJ. and Lavallée, H. eds., Physical fitness assessment. Springfield, 1978.
3. Inbar O & Bar-Or O. Relationships of anaerobic and aerobic arm and leg capacities to swimming performance of 8-12 year old children. In Shephard, R.J. and Lavallée, H. eds., Frontiers of activity and child health. Quebec: Pélican, 1977.
4. Andersen LB., et Al. An Intermittent running test to estimate maximal oxygen uptake: the Andersen test. J Sports Med Physical Fitness 2008.
Original languageDanish
Publication date29 Oct 2010
Publication statusPublished - 29 Oct 2010
EventNordic Conference 2010. Interdisciplinary perspectives on health, participation and effects of sport and exercise - Odense, Denmark
Duration: 28 Oct 201030 Oct 2010

Conference

ConferenceNordic Conference 2010. Interdisciplinary perspectives on health, participation and effects of sport and exercise
CountryDenmark
CityOdense
Period28/10/201030/10/2010

Cite this

Christiansen, C., Petersen, M., Froberg, K., Hansen, L., & Wedderkopp, N. (2010). The 10x5 metre shuttle run test may be a good predictor of aerobic performance in pre-pubertal children. Poster session presented at Nordic Conference 2010. Interdisciplinary perspectives on health, participation and effects of sport and exercise, Odense, Denmark.
Christiansen, Christina ; Petersen, Mette ; Froberg, Karsten ; Hansen, Lone ; Wedderkopp, Niels. / The 10x5 metre shuttle run test may be a good predictor of aerobic performance in pre-pubertal children. Poster session presented at Nordic Conference 2010. Interdisciplinary perspectives on health, participation and effects of sport and exercise, Odense, Denmark.
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title = "The 10x5 metre shuttle run test may be a good predictor of aerobic performance in pre-pubertal children",
abstract = "Introduction: It is well known that low fitness increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in children and adolescents. In addition, studies show that CVD risk factors in children and adolescents track into adulthood (1), which makes monitoring changes in fitness in children during their growth and development important in order to intervene if levels decline. Tests that easily can be conducted in school settings are therefore of great importance. Several laboratory-based studies conducted in children show a positive correlation between aerobic and anaerobic performance. Bar-Or suggested that children, especially pre-pubescent, are metabolic non-specialists. Several laboratory-based studies shows that children, who perform above average in anaerobic performance tests, also possess high maximal O2 uptake (2,3). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the performance in two field tests, the short shuttle run test (SSRT), 10x5 m measuring agility and speed , and the long modified 20 metre shuttle run, the Andersen test (AT) measuring cardio-respiratory fitness (4), representing anaerob and aerob performance respectively. Methods: The population and data was collected from “The Childhood Health Activity and Motor Performance School Study”, a 3-year controlled intervention study in public schools in the municipality of Svendborg, Denmark. Ten Schools with in all 1080 primary school children participated in this study, 515 males and 565 females, 8.4 years of age (±1.44 SD range 5.6-11.3), having completed both the short shuttle run and the Andersen test at baseline. Results: Data were analyzed using STATA{\circledR} (version 10). The association between the performance in the SSRT and the AT was calculated from multiple linear regressions with robust standard errors, to adjust for potential modifying variables. Gender and grade level were found to be possible effect modulators, suggesting several models to be more accurate for the association between the SSRT and the AT. The association of the two tests was highly significant. Discussion: The use of the SSRT as a predictor of aerobic performance, expressed as VO2max, is still to be fully determined. Even though the association between the SSRT and the AT is highly significant, the AT test is only an indirect measure of aerobic performance. This might affect the strength of the validity between the performance in the SSRT and the true expression of aerobic performance. However the association between the running distance in the AT and VO2max measured on the treadmill has previously shown a correlation of r=0.68 for children aged 9.9-11.0 years old (4). The SSRT remains to be validated against anaerobic measurements. Conclusion: The SSRT may provide scientists, teachers and health care professionals with an important tool to estimate physical fitness in children in an easy, non-expensive, fast and fun way in the future.References: 1. Andersen LB, et Al. Secular trends in physical fitness in Danish adol.. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2009.2. Bar-Or O & Inbar O. Relationships among anaerobic capacity, sprint and middle distance running of school children. In Shephard, RJ. and Lavall{\'e}e, H. eds., Physical fitness assessment. Springfield, 1978.3. Inbar O & Bar-Or O. Relationships of anaerobic and aerobic arm and leg capacities to swimming performance of 8-12 year old children. In Shephard, R.J. and Lavall{\'e}e, H. eds., Frontiers of activity and child health. Quebec: P{\'e}lican, 1977.4. Andersen LB., et Al. An Intermittent running test to estimate maximal oxygen uptake: the Andersen test. J Sports Med Physical Fitness 2008.",
author = "Christina Christiansen and Mette Petersen and Karsten Froberg and Lone Hansen and Niels Wedderkopp",
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Christiansen, C, Petersen, M, Froberg, K, Hansen, L & Wedderkopp, N 2010, 'The 10x5 metre shuttle run test may be a good predictor of aerobic performance in pre-pubertal children', Odense, Denmark, 28/10/2010 - 30/10/2010, .

The 10x5 metre shuttle run test may be a good predictor of aerobic performance in pre-pubertal children. / Christiansen, Christina; Petersen, Mette ; Froberg, Karsten; Hansen, Lone; Wedderkopp, Niels.

2010. Poster session presented at Nordic Conference 2010. Interdisciplinary perspectives on health, participation and effects of sport and exercise, Odense, Denmark.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPosterResearch

TY - CONF

T1 - The 10x5 metre shuttle run test may be a good predictor of aerobic performance in pre-pubertal children

AU - Christiansen, Christina

AU - Petersen, Mette

AU - Froberg, Karsten

AU - Hansen, Lone

AU - Wedderkopp, Niels

PY - 2010/10/29

Y1 - 2010/10/29

N2 - Introduction: It is well known that low fitness increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in children and adolescents. In addition, studies show that CVD risk factors in children and adolescents track into adulthood (1), which makes monitoring changes in fitness in children during their growth and development important in order to intervene if levels decline. Tests that easily can be conducted in school settings are therefore of great importance. Several laboratory-based studies conducted in children show a positive correlation between aerobic and anaerobic performance. Bar-Or suggested that children, especially pre-pubescent, are metabolic non-specialists. Several laboratory-based studies shows that children, who perform above average in anaerobic performance tests, also possess high maximal O2 uptake (2,3). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the performance in two field tests, the short shuttle run test (SSRT), 10x5 m measuring agility and speed , and the long modified 20 metre shuttle run, the Andersen test (AT) measuring cardio-respiratory fitness (4), representing anaerob and aerob performance respectively. Methods: The population and data was collected from “The Childhood Health Activity and Motor Performance School Study”, a 3-year controlled intervention study in public schools in the municipality of Svendborg, Denmark. Ten Schools with in all 1080 primary school children participated in this study, 515 males and 565 females, 8.4 years of age (±1.44 SD range 5.6-11.3), having completed both the short shuttle run and the Andersen test at baseline. Results: Data were analyzed using STATA® (version 10). The association between the performance in the SSRT and the AT was calculated from multiple linear regressions with robust standard errors, to adjust for potential modifying variables. Gender and grade level were found to be possible effect modulators, suggesting several models to be more accurate for the association between the SSRT and the AT. The association of the two tests was highly significant. Discussion: The use of the SSRT as a predictor of aerobic performance, expressed as VO2max, is still to be fully determined. Even though the association between the SSRT and the AT is highly significant, the AT test is only an indirect measure of aerobic performance. This might affect the strength of the validity between the performance in the SSRT and the true expression of aerobic performance. However the association between the running distance in the AT and VO2max measured on the treadmill has previously shown a correlation of r=0.68 for children aged 9.9-11.0 years old (4). The SSRT remains to be validated against anaerobic measurements. Conclusion: The SSRT may provide scientists, teachers and health care professionals with an important tool to estimate physical fitness in children in an easy, non-expensive, fast and fun way in the future.References: 1. Andersen LB, et Al. Secular trends in physical fitness in Danish adol.. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2009.2. Bar-Or O & Inbar O. Relationships among anaerobic capacity, sprint and middle distance running of school children. In Shephard, RJ. and Lavallée, H. eds., Physical fitness assessment. Springfield, 1978.3. Inbar O & Bar-Or O. Relationships of anaerobic and aerobic arm and leg capacities to swimming performance of 8-12 year old children. In Shephard, R.J. and Lavallée, H. eds., Frontiers of activity and child health. Quebec: Pélican, 1977.4. Andersen LB., et Al. An Intermittent running test to estimate maximal oxygen uptake: the Andersen test. J Sports Med Physical Fitness 2008.

AB - Introduction: It is well known that low fitness increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in children and adolescents. In addition, studies show that CVD risk factors in children and adolescents track into adulthood (1), which makes monitoring changes in fitness in children during their growth and development important in order to intervene if levels decline. Tests that easily can be conducted in school settings are therefore of great importance. Several laboratory-based studies conducted in children show a positive correlation between aerobic and anaerobic performance. Bar-Or suggested that children, especially pre-pubescent, are metabolic non-specialists. Several laboratory-based studies shows that children, who perform above average in anaerobic performance tests, also possess high maximal O2 uptake (2,3). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the performance in two field tests, the short shuttle run test (SSRT), 10x5 m measuring agility and speed , and the long modified 20 metre shuttle run, the Andersen test (AT) measuring cardio-respiratory fitness (4), representing anaerob and aerob performance respectively. Methods: The population and data was collected from “The Childhood Health Activity and Motor Performance School Study”, a 3-year controlled intervention study in public schools in the municipality of Svendborg, Denmark. Ten Schools with in all 1080 primary school children participated in this study, 515 males and 565 females, 8.4 years of age (±1.44 SD range 5.6-11.3), having completed both the short shuttle run and the Andersen test at baseline. Results: Data were analyzed using STATA® (version 10). The association between the performance in the SSRT and the AT was calculated from multiple linear regressions with robust standard errors, to adjust for potential modifying variables. Gender and grade level were found to be possible effect modulators, suggesting several models to be more accurate for the association between the SSRT and the AT. The association of the two tests was highly significant. Discussion: The use of the SSRT as a predictor of aerobic performance, expressed as VO2max, is still to be fully determined. Even though the association between the SSRT and the AT is highly significant, the AT test is only an indirect measure of aerobic performance. This might affect the strength of the validity between the performance in the SSRT and the true expression of aerobic performance. However the association between the running distance in the AT and VO2max measured on the treadmill has previously shown a correlation of r=0.68 for children aged 9.9-11.0 years old (4). The SSRT remains to be validated against anaerobic measurements. Conclusion: The SSRT may provide scientists, teachers and health care professionals with an important tool to estimate physical fitness in children in an easy, non-expensive, fast and fun way in the future.References: 1. Andersen LB, et Al. Secular trends in physical fitness in Danish adol.. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2009.2. Bar-Or O & Inbar O. Relationships among anaerobic capacity, sprint and middle distance running of school children. In Shephard, RJ. and Lavallée, H. eds., Physical fitness assessment. Springfield, 1978.3. Inbar O & Bar-Or O. Relationships of anaerobic and aerobic arm and leg capacities to swimming performance of 8-12 year old children. In Shephard, R.J. and Lavallée, H. eds., Frontiers of activity and child health. Quebec: Pélican, 1977.4. Andersen LB., et Al. An Intermittent running test to estimate maximal oxygen uptake: the Andersen test. J Sports Med Physical Fitness 2008.

M3 - Poster

ER -

Christiansen C, Petersen M, Froberg K, Hansen L, Wedderkopp N. The 10x5 metre shuttle run test may be a good predictor of aerobic performance in pre-pubertal children. 2010. Poster session presented at Nordic Conference 2010. Interdisciplinary perspectives on health, participation and effects of sport and exercise, Odense, Denmark.