Sulfide intrusion and detoxification in Zostera marina

How to live with sulfidic feet

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Sulfide intrusion in seagrasses represents a global threat to seagrasses. In contrast seegrasses grow in hostile sediments, where they are constantly exposed to sulfide intrusion. Little is known about the strategies to survive sulfide intrusion, if there are detoxification mechanisms and sulfur nutrition in general. By a global review of sulfide intrusion, coupled with a series of field studies and in situ experiments we elucidate sulfide intrusion and different strategies of seagrasses to sustain sulfide intrusion. Using stable isotope tracing, scanning electron microscopy with x-ray analysis to trace sulfur compounds and as well as metabolomics upon sulfide and anoxia exposure we identified different strategies to cope with sulfidic sediments. 1) Avoidance, by reoxidation of gaseous sulfide in the arenchyma to elemental sulfur and sulfate; where precipitation of sulfide occurred as non-toxic elemental sulfur on the inner wall of the root lacunae. 2) Tolerance by incorporation, where gaseous sulfide is incorporated by enzymatic uptake and accumulated as organic sulfur, representing a non-toxic storage compound. We found considerable amounts of sediment sulfides incorporated in seagrasses indicating a possible role of sulfide in the sulfur nutrition beside the detoxification function. Our results suggest different adaptations of Z. marina to reduced sediments and sulfide intrusion ranging from bacterial and chemical reoxidation of sulfide to sulfate to incorporation of sulfide into organic sulfur compounds in the plant.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date2014
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

detoxification
marina
sulfide
sulfur
sediment
nutrition
organic sulfur compound
sulfate
sulfur compound
anoxia
stable isotope

Cite this

@conference{dd2fa0bb50854d8aaa5c84db37638318,
title = "Sulfide intrusion and detoxification in Zostera marina: How to live with sulfidic feet",
abstract = "Sulfide intrusion in seagrasses represents a global threat to seagrasses. In contrast seegrasses grow in hostile sediments, where they are constantly exposed to sulfide intrusion. Little is known about the strategies to survive sulfide intrusion, if there are detoxification mechanisms and sulfur nutrition in general. By a global review of sulfide intrusion, coupled with a series of field studies and in situ experiments we elucidate sulfide intrusion and different strategies of seagrasses to sustain sulfide intrusion. Using stable isotope tracing, scanning electron microscopy with x-ray analysis to trace sulfur compounds and as well as metabolomics upon sulfide and anoxia exposure we identified different strategies to cope with sulfidic sediments. 1) Avoidance, by reoxidation of gaseous sulfide in the arenchyma to elemental sulfur and sulfate; where precipitation of sulfide occurred as non-toxic elemental sulfur on the inner wall of the root lacunae. 2) Tolerance by incorporation, where gaseous sulfide is incorporated by enzymatic uptake and accumulated as organic sulfur, representing a non-toxic storage compound. We found considerable amounts of sediment sulfides incorporated in seagrasses indicating a possible role of sulfide in the sulfur nutrition beside the detoxification function. Our results suggest different adaptations of Z. marina to reduced sediments and sulfide intrusion ranging from bacterial and chemical reoxidation of sulfide to sulfate to incorporation of sulfide into organic sulfur compounds in the plant.",
author = "Harald Hasler-Sheetal and Marianne Holmer",
year = "2014",
language = "English",

}

Sulfide intrusion and detoxification in Zostera marina : How to live with sulfidic feet. / Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne.

2014.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

TY - ABST

T1 - Sulfide intrusion and detoxification in Zostera marina

T2 - How to live with sulfidic feet

AU - Hasler-Sheetal, Harald

AU - Holmer, Marianne

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Sulfide intrusion in seagrasses represents a global threat to seagrasses. In contrast seegrasses grow in hostile sediments, where they are constantly exposed to sulfide intrusion. Little is known about the strategies to survive sulfide intrusion, if there are detoxification mechanisms and sulfur nutrition in general. By a global review of sulfide intrusion, coupled with a series of field studies and in situ experiments we elucidate sulfide intrusion and different strategies of seagrasses to sustain sulfide intrusion. Using stable isotope tracing, scanning electron microscopy with x-ray analysis to trace sulfur compounds and as well as metabolomics upon sulfide and anoxia exposure we identified different strategies to cope with sulfidic sediments. 1) Avoidance, by reoxidation of gaseous sulfide in the arenchyma to elemental sulfur and sulfate; where precipitation of sulfide occurred as non-toxic elemental sulfur on the inner wall of the root lacunae. 2) Tolerance by incorporation, where gaseous sulfide is incorporated by enzymatic uptake and accumulated as organic sulfur, representing a non-toxic storage compound. We found considerable amounts of sediment sulfides incorporated in seagrasses indicating a possible role of sulfide in the sulfur nutrition beside the detoxification function. Our results suggest different adaptations of Z. marina to reduced sediments and sulfide intrusion ranging from bacterial and chemical reoxidation of sulfide to sulfate to incorporation of sulfide into organic sulfur compounds in the plant.

AB - Sulfide intrusion in seagrasses represents a global threat to seagrasses. In contrast seegrasses grow in hostile sediments, where they are constantly exposed to sulfide intrusion. Little is known about the strategies to survive sulfide intrusion, if there are detoxification mechanisms and sulfur nutrition in general. By a global review of sulfide intrusion, coupled with a series of field studies and in situ experiments we elucidate sulfide intrusion and different strategies of seagrasses to sustain sulfide intrusion. Using stable isotope tracing, scanning electron microscopy with x-ray analysis to trace sulfur compounds and as well as metabolomics upon sulfide and anoxia exposure we identified different strategies to cope with sulfidic sediments. 1) Avoidance, by reoxidation of gaseous sulfide in the arenchyma to elemental sulfur and sulfate; where precipitation of sulfide occurred as non-toxic elemental sulfur on the inner wall of the root lacunae. 2) Tolerance by incorporation, where gaseous sulfide is incorporated by enzymatic uptake and accumulated as organic sulfur, representing a non-toxic storage compound. We found considerable amounts of sediment sulfides incorporated in seagrasses indicating a possible role of sulfide in the sulfur nutrition beside the detoxification function. Our results suggest different adaptations of Z. marina to reduced sediments and sulfide intrusion ranging from bacterial and chemical reoxidation of sulfide to sulfate to incorporation of sulfide into organic sulfur compounds in the plant.

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

ER -