Statins and polyneuropathy revisited: Case-control study in Denmark, 1999-2013

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

AIM: In a previous study, we found a positive association between statin use and polyneuropathy risk. Other studies reported equivocal results. The present study aimed to confirm our findings with a design similar to our previous study, but with a larger data set.

METHODS: We searched medical registry data to identify patients diagnosed with incident polyneuropathy of no known cause (idiopathic polyneuropathy) in 1999-2013; we verified the diagnosis through medical records. For each case, we recruited 20 general population controls with no previous history of polyneuropathy. Controls were matched to their respective case for age, and sex. We ascertained prior statin use of cases and controls through a prescription registry. Based on this information, exposure to statins was categorized into "ever use" or "never use". Ever use of statins was classified by recency ("current use" or "past use"); current use was further classified into long-term use (5+ years) and high or low intensity use. We used conditional logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to examine associations between polyneuropathy and statin use.

RESULTS: We included 370 validated cases and 7400 controls. Ever use of statins was not associated with elevated risk of polyneuropathy (OR: 1.14, 95%CI: 0.84-1.54). Similarly, we found no associations between polyneuropathy risk and current use (OR: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.79-1.53), long-term use (OR: 1.13, 95%CI: 0.66-1.92), or high intensity statin use (OR: 1.05, 95%CI: 0.59-1.84).

CONCLUSION: Statin use was not associated with an increased risk of idiopathic polyneuropathy.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Volume83
Issue number9
Pages (from-to)2087–2095
ISSN0306-5251
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Denmark
Case-Control Studies
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Registries
Population Control
Medical Records
Prescriptions
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Journal Article

Cite this

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title = "Statins and polyneuropathy revisited: Case-control study in Denmark, 1999-2013",
abstract = "AIM: In a previous study, we found a positive association between statin use and polyneuropathy risk. Other studies reported equivocal results. The present study aimed to confirm our findings with a design similar to our previous study, but with a larger data set.METHODS: We searched medical registry data to identify patients diagnosed with incident polyneuropathy of no known cause (idiopathic polyneuropathy) in 1999-2013; we verified the diagnosis through medical records. For each case, we recruited 20 general population controls with no previous history of polyneuropathy. Controls were matched to their respective case for age, and sex. We ascertained prior statin use of cases and controls through a prescription registry. Based on this information, exposure to statins was categorized into {"}ever use{"} or {"}never use{"}. Ever use of statins was classified by recency ({"}current use{"} or {"}past use{"}); current use was further classified into long-term use (5+ years) and high or low intensity use. We used conditional logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs) to examine associations between polyneuropathy and statin use.RESULTS: We included 370 validated cases and 7400 controls. Ever use of statins was not associated with elevated risk of polyneuropathy (OR: 1.14, 95{\%}CI: 0.84-1.54). Similarly, we found no associations between polyneuropathy risk and current use (OR: 1.11, 95{\%} CI: 0.79-1.53), long-term use (OR: 1.13, 95{\%}CI: 0.66-1.92), or high intensity statin use (OR: 1.05, 95{\%}CI: 0.59-1.84).CONCLUSION: Statin use was not associated with an increased risk of idiopathic polyneuropathy.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Svendsen, {Toke de Koning} and Hansen, {Peter N{\o}rregaard} and Garc{\'i}a-Rodr{\'i}guez, {Luis Alberto} and Lene Andersen and Jesper Hallas and Sindrup, {S{\o}ren Hein} and David Gaist",
note = "This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1111/bcp.13298",
language = "English",
volume = "83",
pages = "2087–2095",
journal = "British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology",
issn = "0306-5251",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
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Statins and polyneuropathy revisited : Case-control study in Denmark, 1999-2013. / Svendsen, Toke de Koning; Hansen, Peter Nørregaard; García-Rodríguez, Luis Alberto; Andersen, Lene; Hallas, Jesper; Sindrup, Søren Hein; Gaist, David.

In: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Vol. 83, No. 9, 2017, p. 2087–2095.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Statins and polyneuropathy revisited

T2 - Case-control study in Denmark, 1999-2013

AU - Svendsen, Toke de Koning

AU - Hansen, Peter Nørregaard

AU - García-Rodríguez, Luis Alberto

AU - Andersen, Lene

AU - Hallas, Jesper

AU - Sindrup, Søren Hein

AU - Gaist, David

N1 - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - AIM: In a previous study, we found a positive association between statin use and polyneuropathy risk. Other studies reported equivocal results. The present study aimed to confirm our findings with a design similar to our previous study, but with a larger data set.METHODS: We searched medical registry data to identify patients diagnosed with incident polyneuropathy of no known cause (idiopathic polyneuropathy) in 1999-2013; we verified the diagnosis through medical records. For each case, we recruited 20 general population controls with no previous history of polyneuropathy. Controls were matched to their respective case for age, and sex. We ascertained prior statin use of cases and controls through a prescription registry. Based on this information, exposure to statins was categorized into "ever use" or "never use". Ever use of statins was classified by recency ("current use" or "past use"); current use was further classified into long-term use (5+ years) and high or low intensity use. We used conditional logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to examine associations between polyneuropathy and statin use.RESULTS: We included 370 validated cases and 7400 controls. Ever use of statins was not associated with elevated risk of polyneuropathy (OR: 1.14, 95%CI: 0.84-1.54). Similarly, we found no associations between polyneuropathy risk and current use (OR: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.79-1.53), long-term use (OR: 1.13, 95%CI: 0.66-1.92), or high intensity statin use (OR: 1.05, 95%CI: 0.59-1.84).CONCLUSION: Statin use was not associated with an increased risk of idiopathic polyneuropathy.

AB - AIM: In a previous study, we found a positive association between statin use and polyneuropathy risk. Other studies reported equivocal results. The present study aimed to confirm our findings with a design similar to our previous study, but with a larger data set.METHODS: We searched medical registry data to identify patients diagnosed with incident polyneuropathy of no known cause (idiopathic polyneuropathy) in 1999-2013; we verified the diagnosis through medical records. For each case, we recruited 20 general population controls with no previous history of polyneuropathy. Controls were matched to their respective case for age, and sex. We ascertained prior statin use of cases and controls through a prescription registry. Based on this information, exposure to statins was categorized into "ever use" or "never use". Ever use of statins was classified by recency ("current use" or "past use"); current use was further classified into long-term use (5+ years) and high or low intensity use. We used conditional logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to examine associations between polyneuropathy and statin use.RESULTS: We included 370 validated cases and 7400 controls. Ever use of statins was not associated with elevated risk of polyneuropathy (OR: 1.14, 95%CI: 0.84-1.54). Similarly, we found no associations between polyneuropathy risk and current use (OR: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.79-1.53), long-term use (OR: 1.13, 95%CI: 0.66-1.92), or high intensity statin use (OR: 1.05, 95%CI: 0.59-1.84).CONCLUSION: Statin use was not associated with an increased risk of idiopathic polyneuropathy.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1111/bcp.13298

DO - 10.1111/bcp.13298

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 28370351

VL - 83

SP - 2087

EP - 2095

JO - British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

JF - British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

SN - 0306-5251

IS - 9

ER -