Standardized simulated palpation training--development of a palpation trainer and assessment of palpatory skills in experienced and inexperienced clinicians

Anders Holsgaard Larsen, Corrie Myburgh, Jan Hartvigsen, Cuno Rasmussen, Hartvig Marianne, Marstrand Kristian, Per Aagaard

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Specific palpation skills are required to identify and treat myofascial pain. The aim of this study was to develop a device that reflects absolute pressure values during simulated palpation, and to test the hypothesis that training through standardized manual palpation results in improved skills for experienced and inexperienced examiners. Experienced (n = 30) and inexperienced (n = 30) examiners were randomly divided into either training or control. A device (Palpation Trainer) was constructed to measure pressure intensity (P(peak)) and rate of pressure development (RPD). Training consisted of 8-10 min standardized simulated palpation, during which examiners followed a standardized pressure-time curve (visualized in real-time on a pc-monitor). Controls received no training. Tests were performed at baseline, immediately post training and again after 48 h and analyzed for P(peak) and RPD. After simulated palpation training, experienced examiners improved palpatory skills related to P(peak) and RPD (i.e. performed closer to predetermined guidelines and with reduced inter-examiner variation), while inexperienced examiners only improved RPD (p <0.05). Thus, standardized training resulted in acute and temporary (48 h) changes in selected analysis variables during simulated palpation in experienced and to some extent also in inexperienced clinicians. Whether this can be transferred to clinical in vivo setting requires further study.
Original languageEnglish
JournalManual Therapy
Volume15
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)254-260
Number of pages7
ISSN1356-689X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1. Jun 2010

Fingerprint

Palpation
Equipment and Supplies
Guidelines

Keywords

  • Calibration
  • Chiropractic
  • Denmark
  • Educational Technology
  • Facial Pain
  • Humans
  • Musculoskeletal Manipulations
  • Palpation
  • Pressure
  • Reference Standards
  • Reproducibility of Results
  • Single-Blind Method

Cite this

@article{2a0dc91441c04dd3952e9a2d6630a4b4,
title = "Standardized simulated palpation training--development of a palpation trainer and assessment of palpatory skills in experienced and inexperienced clinicians",
abstract = "Specific palpation skills are required to identify and treat myofascial pain. The aim of this study was to develop a device that reflects absolute pressure values during simulated palpation, and to test the hypothesis that training through standardized manual palpation results in improved skills for experienced and inexperienced examiners. Experienced (n = 30) and inexperienced (n = 30) examiners were randomly divided into either training or control. A device (Palpation Trainer) was constructed to measure pressure intensity (P(peak)) and rate of pressure development (RPD). Training consisted of 8-10 min standardized simulated palpation, during which examiners followed a standardized pressure-time curve (visualized in real-time on a pc-monitor). Controls received no training. Tests were performed at baseline, immediately post training and again after 48 h and analyzed for P(peak) and RPD. After simulated palpation training, experienced examiners improved palpatory skills related to P(peak) and RPD (i.e. performed closer to predetermined guidelines and with reduced inter-examiner variation), while inexperienced examiners only improved RPD (p <0.05). Thus, standardized training resulted in acute and temporary (48 h) changes in selected analysis variables during simulated palpation in experienced and to some extent also in inexperienced clinicians. Whether this can be transferred to clinical in vivo setting requires further study.",
keywords = "Calibration, Chiropractic, Denmark, Educational Technology, Facial Pain, Humans, Musculoskeletal Manipulations, Palpation, Pressure, Reference Standards, Reproducibility of Results, Single-Blind Method",
author = "Larsen, {Anders Holsgaard} and Corrie Myburgh and Jan Hartvigsen and Cuno Rasmussen and Hartvig Marianne and Marstrand Kristian and Per Aagaard",
year = "2010",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.math.2010.01.003",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "254--260",
journal = "Musculoskeletal Science and Practice",
issn = "2468-7812",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "3",

}

Standardized simulated palpation training--development of a palpation trainer and assessment of palpatory skills in experienced and inexperienced clinicians. / Larsen, Anders Holsgaard; Myburgh, Corrie; Hartvigsen, Jan; Rasmussen, Cuno; Marianne, Hartvig; Kristian, Marstrand; Aagaard, Per.

In: Manual Therapy, Vol. 15, No. 3, 01.06.2010, p. 254-260.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Standardized simulated palpation training--development of a palpation trainer and assessment of palpatory skills in experienced and inexperienced clinicians

AU - Larsen, Anders Holsgaard

AU - Myburgh, Corrie

AU - Hartvigsen, Jan

AU - Rasmussen, Cuno

AU - Marianne, Hartvig

AU - Kristian, Marstrand

AU - Aagaard, Per

PY - 2010/6/1

Y1 - 2010/6/1

N2 - Specific palpation skills are required to identify and treat myofascial pain. The aim of this study was to develop a device that reflects absolute pressure values during simulated palpation, and to test the hypothesis that training through standardized manual palpation results in improved skills for experienced and inexperienced examiners. Experienced (n = 30) and inexperienced (n = 30) examiners were randomly divided into either training or control. A device (Palpation Trainer) was constructed to measure pressure intensity (P(peak)) and rate of pressure development (RPD). Training consisted of 8-10 min standardized simulated palpation, during which examiners followed a standardized pressure-time curve (visualized in real-time on a pc-monitor). Controls received no training. Tests were performed at baseline, immediately post training and again after 48 h and analyzed for P(peak) and RPD. After simulated palpation training, experienced examiners improved palpatory skills related to P(peak) and RPD (i.e. performed closer to predetermined guidelines and with reduced inter-examiner variation), while inexperienced examiners only improved RPD (p <0.05). Thus, standardized training resulted in acute and temporary (48 h) changes in selected analysis variables during simulated palpation in experienced and to some extent also in inexperienced clinicians. Whether this can be transferred to clinical in vivo setting requires further study.

AB - Specific palpation skills are required to identify and treat myofascial pain. The aim of this study was to develop a device that reflects absolute pressure values during simulated palpation, and to test the hypothesis that training through standardized manual palpation results in improved skills for experienced and inexperienced examiners. Experienced (n = 30) and inexperienced (n = 30) examiners were randomly divided into either training or control. A device (Palpation Trainer) was constructed to measure pressure intensity (P(peak)) and rate of pressure development (RPD). Training consisted of 8-10 min standardized simulated palpation, during which examiners followed a standardized pressure-time curve (visualized in real-time on a pc-monitor). Controls received no training. Tests were performed at baseline, immediately post training and again after 48 h and analyzed for P(peak) and RPD. After simulated palpation training, experienced examiners improved palpatory skills related to P(peak) and RPD (i.e. performed closer to predetermined guidelines and with reduced inter-examiner variation), while inexperienced examiners only improved RPD (p <0.05). Thus, standardized training resulted in acute and temporary (48 h) changes in selected analysis variables during simulated palpation in experienced and to some extent also in inexperienced clinicians. Whether this can be transferred to clinical in vivo setting requires further study.

KW - Calibration

KW - Chiropractic

KW - Denmark

KW - Educational Technology

KW - Facial Pain

KW - Humans

KW - Musculoskeletal Manipulations

KW - Palpation

KW - Pressure

KW - Reference Standards

KW - Reproducibility of Results

KW - Single-Blind Method

U2 - 10.1016/j.math.2010.01.003

DO - 10.1016/j.math.2010.01.003

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 20171136

VL - 15

SP - 254

EP - 260

JO - Musculoskeletal Science and Practice

JF - Musculoskeletal Science and Practice

SN - 2468-7812

IS - 3

ER -