Spinal cord injury and development of pressure injury during acute rehabilitation in Norway: a national retrospective cross-sectional study

Ingebjørg Irgens*, Jana M. Hoff, Rolf Jelnes, Marcalee Alexander, Johan K. Stanghelle, Magne Thoresen, Tiina Rekand

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Study design: A national, retrospective, cross-sectional study. Objectives: To analyze the prevalence of pressure injury (PI), and characteristics associated with PI development in the hospitalized population of persons with a newly acquired spinal cord injury (SCI) between 2004 and 2014. Setting: All three specialized Spinal Cord Units in Norway. Methods: Demographic data related to prevalence and potential risk factors were retrieved from the electronic medical record (EMR). Statistical analyses were performed, using IBM SPSS Statistics, version 23. Results: We identified 1012 individuals with a new SCI. Mean age at injury was 48 years (SD 19). The period prevalence of PI was 16% (95% CI = 0.14–0.19), and identified PI associations were complete SCI (OR = 0.1), being injured abroad (OR = 2.4), bowel (OR = 13), and bladder (OR = 9.2) dysfunction; comorbidities like diabetes mellitus 1 (OR = 7.9), diagnosed depression (OR = 3.8), ventilator support (OR = 3.0), drug abuse (OR = 3.0), and concurrent traumatic brain injury (OR = 1.7). Individuals in the age group of 15–29 years had higher odds of PI compared with middle-aged individuals (45–59 years). Conclusion: PI is a serious complication after SCI. The association between depression or comorbidity and PI occurrence should be investigated more thoroughly. We recommend implementation of a simple follow-up program regarding observation and prevention of PI. Increased awareness of factors that could contribute to PI will help to focus on better prevention and early recognition of PI. This will contribute to more optimal rehabilitation.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSpinal Cord
Volume58
Pages (from-to)1069-1079
ISSN1362-4393
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2020

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