Smoking and risk for psoriasis: a population-based twin study

Ann Sophie Lønnberg, Lone Skov, Axel Skytthe, Kirsten Ohm Kyvik, Ole Birger Pedersen, Simon Francis Thomsen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Smoking is a potential risk factor for psoriasis. Both psoriasis and smoking habits are partly explained by genetic factors. However, twin studies investigating the association between these traits are limited.

METHODS: Questionnaire-based data on smoking habits and psoriasis were collected for 34,781 twins, aged 20-71 years, from the Danish Twin Registry. A co-twin control analysis was performed on 1700 twin pairs discordant for lifetime history of smoking. Genetic and environmental correlations between smoking and psoriasis were estimated using classical twin modeling.

RESULTS: After multivariable adjustment, age group (50-71 vs. 20-49 years) and childhood exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) were significantly associated with psoriasis in the whole population (odds ratio [OR] 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.29 [P = 0.021] and OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.10-1.49 [P = 0.002], respectively). Risk for psoriasis increased substantially (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.82-2.61; P < 0.001) for smokers with a history of >5 pack-years, even after adjusting for age, sex, and childhood ETS. Among twin pairs discordant for smoking, risk for psoriasis in the ever-smoking twin was lower among monozygotic twins (OR 1.23, 95% CI 0.59-2.56; P = 0.578) than among same-sex dizygotic twins (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.36-3.58; P = 0.001). Genetic factors explained 20% (14-25%; P < 0.001) of the correlation between psoriasis and smoking, whereas non-shared environmental factors explained 8% (0-22%; P = 0.504).

CONCLUSIONS: Tobacco consumption and childhood ETS are significantly associated with psoriasis. Results indicate shared genetic factors for smoking and psoriasis.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Dermatology
Volume55
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)72-8
ISSN0011-9059
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2016

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Twin Studies
Psoriasis
Smoking
Population
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Smoke
Habits
Social Adjustment
Dizygotic Twins
Monozygotic Twins
Environmental Exposure
Tobacco Use
Registries
Age Groups

Cite this

Lønnberg, Ann Sophie ; Skov, Lone ; Skytthe, Axel ; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm ; Pedersen, Ole Birger ; Thomsen, Simon Francis. / Smoking and risk for psoriasis : a population-based twin study. In: International Journal of Dermatology. 2016 ; Vol. 55, No. 2. pp. 72-8.
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title = "Smoking and risk for psoriasis: a population-based twin study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Smoking is a potential risk factor for psoriasis. Both psoriasis and smoking habits are partly explained by genetic factors. However, twin studies investigating the association between these traits are limited.METHODS: Questionnaire-based data on smoking habits and psoriasis were collected for 34,781 twins, aged 20-71 years, from the Danish Twin Registry. A co-twin control analysis was performed on 1700 twin pairs discordant for lifetime history of smoking. Genetic and environmental correlations between smoking and psoriasis were estimated using classical twin modeling.RESULTS: After multivariable adjustment, age group (50-71 vs. 20-49 years) and childhood exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) were significantly associated with psoriasis in the whole population (odds ratio [OR] 1.15, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.29 [P = 0.021] and OR 1.28, 95{\%} CI 1.10-1.49 [P = 0.002], respectively). Risk for psoriasis increased substantially (OR 2.18, 95{\%} CI 1.82-2.61; P < 0.001) for smokers with a history of >5 pack-years, even after adjusting for age, sex, and childhood ETS. Among twin pairs discordant for smoking, risk for psoriasis in the ever-smoking twin was lower among monozygotic twins (OR 1.23, 95{\%} CI 0.59-2.56; P = 0.578) than among same-sex dizygotic twins (OR 2.21, 95{\%} CI 1.36-3.58; P = 0.001). Genetic factors explained 20{\%} (14-25{\%}; P < 0.001) of the correlation between psoriasis and smoking, whereas non-shared environmental factors explained 8{\%} (0-22{\%}; P = 0.504).CONCLUSIONS: Tobacco consumption and childhood ETS are significantly associated with psoriasis. Results indicate shared genetic factors for smoking and psoriasis.",
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Smoking and risk for psoriasis : a population-based twin study. / Lønnberg, Ann Sophie; Skov, Lone; Skytthe, Axel; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Pedersen, Ole Birger; Thomsen, Simon Francis.

In: International Journal of Dermatology, Vol. 55, No. 2, 02.2016, p. 72-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Smoking and risk for psoriasis

T2 - a population-based twin study

AU - Lønnberg, Ann Sophie

AU - Skov, Lone

AU - Skytthe, Axel

AU - Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

AU - Pedersen, Ole Birger

AU - Thomsen, Simon Francis

N1 - © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

PY - 2016/2

Y1 - 2016/2

N2 - BACKGROUND: Smoking is a potential risk factor for psoriasis. Both psoriasis and smoking habits are partly explained by genetic factors. However, twin studies investigating the association between these traits are limited.METHODS: Questionnaire-based data on smoking habits and psoriasis were collected for 34,781 twins, aged 20-71 years, from the Danish Twin Registry. A co-twin control analysis was performed on 1700 twin pairs discordant for lifetime history of smoking. Genetic and environmental correlations between smoking and psoriasis were estimated using classical twin modeling.RESULTS: After multivariable adjustment, age group (50-71 vs. 20-49 years) and childhood exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) were significantly associated with psoriasis in the whole population (odds ratio [OR] 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.29 [P = 0.021] and OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.10-1.49 [P = 0.002], respectively). Risk for psoriasis increased substantially (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.82-2.61; P < 0.001) for smokers with a history of >5 pack-years, even after adjusting for age, sex, and childhood ETS. Among twin pairs discordant for smoking, risk for psoriasis in the ever-smoking twin was lower among monozygotic twins (OR 1.23, 95% CI 0.59-2.56; P = 0.578) than among same-sex dizygotic twins (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.36-3.58; P = 0.001). Genetic factors explained 20% (14-25%; P < 0.001) of the correlation between psoriasis and smoking, whereas non-shared environmental factors explained 8% (0-22%; P = 0.504).CONCLUSIONS: Tobacco consumption and childhood ETS are significantly associated with psoriasis. Results indicate shared genetic factors for smoking and psoriasis.

AB - BACKGROUND: Smoking is a potential risk factor for psoriasis. Both psoriasis and smoking habits are partly explained by genetic factors. However, twin studies investigating the association between these traits are limited.METHODS: Questionnaire-based data on smoking habits and psoriasis were collected for 34,781 twins, aged 20-71 years, from the Danish Twin Registry. A co-twin control analysis was performed on 1700 twin pairs discordant for lifetime history of smoking. Genetic and environmental correlations between smoking and psoriasis were estimated using classical twin modeling.RESULTS: After multivariable adjustment, age group (50-71 vs. 20-49 years) and childhood exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) were significantly associated with psoriasis in the whole population (odds ratio [OR] 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.29 [P = 0.021] and OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.10-1.49 [P = 0.002], respectively). Risk for psoriasis increased substantially (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.82-2.61; P < 0.001) for smokers with a history of >5 pack-years, even after adjusting for age, sex, and childhood ETS. Among twin pairs discordant for smoking, risk for psoriasis in the ever-smoking twin was lower among monozygotic twins (OR 1.23, 95% CI 0.59-2.56; P = 0.578) than among same-sex dizygotic twins (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.36-3.58; P = 0.001). Genetic factors explained 20% (14-25%; P < 0.001) of the correlation between psoriasis and smoking, whereas non-shared environmental factors explained 8% (0-22%; P = 0.504).CONCLUSIONS: Tobacco consumption and childhood ETS are significantly associated with psoriasis. Results indicate shared genetic factors for smoking and psoriasis.

U2 - 10.1111/ijd.13073

DO - 10.1111/ijd.13073

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 26275356

VL - 55

SP - 72

EP - 78

JO - International Journal of Dermatology

JF - International Journal of Dermatology

SN - 0011-9059

IS - 2

ER -