Significant others' perspectives on person-centred information and communication technology in stroke rehabilitation - a grounded theory study

Mille Nabsen Marwaa*, Charlotte Ytterberg, Susanne Guidetti

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

AIM: The aim of this study was to explore significant others' perspectives on how information and communication technology can support the rehabilitation process after stroke and facilitate participation in everyday life.

METHOD: Thirteen significant others were included in the study, and to capture their perspectives, two focus groups, and five individual interviews were carried out in Denmark and Sweden 6-12 months after the stroke incident. A grounded theory approach was used throughout the study and a constant comparative method was used in the analysis.

RESULTS: Five subcategories were identified from the analysis of the interviews: (1) Information and communication technology providing a sense of security, (2) Information and communication technology as a social mediator, (3) Information and communication technology as a compensator for deficits, (4) Information and communication technology as a way to reach information, and (5) Information and communication technology as a possibility to supplement the rehabilitation process. From these categories, one core category emerged: The potential of information and communication technology to facilitate participation in everyday life and thereby reduce the strains that significant others experience after stroke.

CONCLUSION: Information and communication technology has the potential to facilitate participation in everyday life after stroke. It is important, therefore, to start using information and communication technology in the rehabilitation process after stroke, to bring meaning to everyday life and to support both the stroke survivors and their significant others. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Integration of information and communication technology in the rehabilitation process after stroke can accommodate several of the significant others´ needs. Educating stroke survivors to use information and communication technology as part of the rehabilitation process offloads their significant others. Integration of information and communication technology in the rehabilitation process after stroke can bring new meaning in everyday life and can facilitate both independence and participation in everyday life.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDisability and rehabilitation
Volume42
Issue number15
Pages (from-to)2115-2122
ISSN0963-8288
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2020

Keywords

  • Rehabilitation
  • mobile phone
  • participation in everyday life
  • qualitative method
  • telerehabilitation

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