Salesman? Hell no!’ - Identity Struggles of Nascent Design Entrepreneurs

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The present study offers new input to the discussion of how entrepreneurship education and training programmes can be tailored to suit design professionals. To a large extent, existing entrepreneurship teaching for creative people is based on a traditional administrative management logic that often results in a clash between entrepreneurial demands and creative identities. The paper is based on the following rationale: the better we understand designers' reasoning and their struggles concerning becoming entrepreneurs, the better we are able to design entrepreneurship learning experiences that meet their needs. Since designers' career‐making tends to be highly driven by their strong sense of identity, the paper takes an identity perspective. The empirical foundation of the research is based on observation studies and phenomenological interviews conducted during an eight‐week entrepreneurship training program. Twenty‐five nascent design entrepreneurs with a professional background as designers participated in the voluntary programme. The paper offers novel and critical insights into designers' experiences of the entrepreneurial identity and reasoning as they participate in entrepreneurship training.
Original languageEnglish
JournalCreativity and Innovation Management
Volume27
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)358-369
ISSN0963-1690
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Fingerprint

Teaching
Education
Entrepreneurship
Entrepreneurs
Training program
Voluntary programs
Logic
Entrepreneurship education
Rationale

Cite this

@article{2aac408e65504fb98eba06b53e87729d,
title = "Salesman? Hell no!’ - Identity Struggles of Nascent Design Entrepreneurs",
abstract = "The present study offers new input to the discussion of how entrepreneurship education and training programmes can be tailored to suit design professionals. To a large extent, existing entrepreneurship teaching for creative people is based on a traditional administrative management logic that often results in a clash between entrepreneurial demands and creative identities. The paper is based on the following rationale: the better we understand designers' reasoning and their struggles concerning becoming entrepreneurs, the better we are able to design entrepreneurship learning experiences that meet their needs. Since designers' career‐making tends to be highly driven by their strong sense of identity, the paper takes an identity perspective. The empirical foundation of the research is based on observation studies and phenomenological interviews conducted during an eight‐week entrepreneurship training program. Twenty‐five nascent design entrepreneurs with a professional background as designers participated in the voluntary programme. The paper offers novel and critical insights into designers' experiences of the entrepreneurial identity and reasoning as they participate in entrepreneurship training.",
keywords = "design entrepreneurship professional culture professional identity",
author = "Nielsen, {Suna L{\o}we} and Birgitte Norlyk and {Rind Christensen}, Poul",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1111/caim.12275",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "358--369",
journal = "Creativity and Innovation Management",
issn = "0963-1690",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

Salesman? Hell no!’ - Identity Struggles of Nascent Design Entrepreneurs. / Nielsen, Suna Løwe; Norlyk, Birgitte; Rind Christensen, Poul.

In: Creativity and Innovation Management, Vol. 27, No. 3, 2018, p. 358-369.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Salesman? Hell no!’ - Identity Struggles of Nascent Design Entrepreneurs

AU - Nielsen, Suna Løwe

AU - Norlyk, Birgitte

AU - Rind Christensen, Poul

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - The present study offers new input to the discussion of how entrepreneurship education and training programmes can be tailored to suit design professionals. To a large extent, existing entrepreneurship teaching for creative people is based on a traditional administrative management logic that often results in a clash between entrepreneurial demands and creative identities. The paper is based on the following rationale: the better we understand designers' reasoning and their struggles concerning becoming entrepreneurs, the better we are able to design entrepreneurship learning experiences that meet their needs. Since designers' career‐making tends to be highly driven by their strong sense of identity, the paper takes an identity perspective. The empirical foundation of the research is based on observation studies and phenomenological interviews conducted during an eight‐week entrepreneurship training program. Twenty‐five nascent design entrepreneurs with a professional background as designers participated in the voluntary programme. The paper offers novel and critical insights into designers' experiences of the entrepreneurial identity and reasoning as they participate in entrepreneurship training.

AB - The present study offers new input to the discussion of how entrepreneurship education and training programmes can be tailored to suit design professionals. To a large extent, existing entrepreneurship teaching for creative people is based on a traditional administrative management logic that often results in a clash between entrepreneurial demands and creative identities. The paper is based on the following rationale: the better we understand designers' reasoning and their struggles concerning becoming entrepreneurs, the better we are able to design entrepreneurship learning experiences that meet their needs. Since designers' career‐making tends to be highly driven by their strong sense of identity, the paper takes an identity perspective. The empirical foundation of the research is based on observation studies and phenomenological interviews conducted during an eight‐week entrepreneurship training program. Twenty‐five nascent design entrepreneurs with a professional background as designers participated in the voluntary programme. The paper offers novel and critical insights into designers' experiences of the entrepreneurial identity and reasoning as they participate in entrepreneurship training.

KW - design entrepreneurship professional culture professional identity

U2 - 10.1111/caim.12275

DO - 10.1111/caim.12275

M3 - Journal article

VL - 27

SP - 358

EP - 369

JO - Creativity and Innovation Management

JF - Creativity and Innovation Management

SN - 0963-1690

IS - 3

ER -