Risk factors for development and persistence of chronic widespread pain in spondyloarthritis: a population-based two-year follow-up study

E. Mogard*, E. Lindqvist, A. Bremander, S. Bergman

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Objective: To study chronic widespread pain (CWP) over time in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA), and to identify risk factors for development and persistence of CWP. Methods: In this cohort study with baseline and 2.5 year follow-up postal surveys, patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and undifferentiated spondyloarthritis (USpA) (47% women) answered questions regarding pain, and were categorized as no chronic pain (NCP), chronic regional pain (CRP), or CWP. For each risk factor candidate (disease duration, body mass index, smoking, and patient-reported outcome measures), logistic regression analyses with CWP as the main outcome were performed separately, together with a basic model including age, gender, and SpA subgroup. Results: Altogether, 644 patients could be categorized at both time-points, yielding similar prevalence estimates at baseline and follow-up, although 38% transitioned between pain groups. Risk factors (odds ratio; 95% confidence interval) for development of CWP included more pain regions (1.36; 1.20‒1.53), higher pain intensity (1.35; 1.20‒1.52), worse fatigue (1.25; 1.13‒1.38), and worse global health (1.35; 1.19‒1.54). Persistent CWP was reported by 72%. In addition to factors predicting development of CWP, higher age (1.02; 1.00‒1.04), female gender (1.82; 1.06‒3.10), and anxiety (1.07; 1.00–1.14) also predicted persistence. Conclusion: The prevalence of CWP remained high over time, but with individual transitions between the pain groups. The development and persistence of CWP were predicted by more pain and worse health, with the addition of female gender and higher age for persistent CWP. Special attention and treatment alternatives for patients with SpA and concomitant CWP are essential in the clinic.

Original languageEnglish
JournalScandinavian Journal of Rheumatology
Volume48
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)460-468
ISSN0300-9742
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2019

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Chronic Pain
Population
Body Mass Index
Cohort Studies
Logistic Models
Smoking
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Confidence Intervals

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@article{68f108849b1841bbb547a9d4f924c28a,
title = "Risk factors for development and persistence of chronic widespread pain in spondyloarthritis: a population-based two-year follow-up study",
abstract = "Objective: To study chronic widespread pain (CWP) over time in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA), and to identify risk factors for development and persistence of CWP. Methods: In this cohort study with baseline and 2.5 year follow-up postal surveys, patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and undifferentiated spondyloarthritis (USpA) (47{\%} women) answered questions regarding pain, and were categorized as no chronic pain (NCP), chronic regional pain (CRP), or CWP. For each risk factor candidate (disease duration, body mass index, smoking, and patient-reported outcome measures), logistic regression analyses with CWP as the main outcome were performed separately, together with a basic model including age, gender, and SpA subgroup. Results: Altogether, 644 patients could be categorized at both time-points, yielding similar prevalence estimates at baseline and follow-up, although 38{\%} transitioned between pain groups. Risk factors (odds ratio; 95{\%} confidence interval) for development of CWP included more pain regions (1.36; 1.20‒1.53), higher pain intensity (1.35; 1.20‒1.52), worse fatigue (1.25; 1.13‒1.38), and worse global health (1.35; 1.19‒1.54). Persistent CWP was reported by 72{\%}. In addition to factors predicting development of CWP, higher age (1.02; 1.00‒1.04), female gender (1.82; 1.06‒3.10), and anxiety (1.07; 1.00–1.14) also predicted persistence. Conclusion: The prevalence of CWP remained high over time, but with individual transitions between the pain groups. The development and persistence of CWP were predicted by more pain and worse health, with the addition of female gender and higher age for persistent CWP. Special attention and treatment alternatives for patients with SpA and concomitant CWP are essential in the clinic.",
author = "E. Mogard and E. Lindqvist and A. Bremander and S. Bergman",
year = "2019",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1080/03009742.2019.1602163",
language = "English",
volume = "48",
pages = "460--468",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology",
issn = "0300-9742",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
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}

Risk factors for development and persistence of chronic widespread pain in spondyloarthritis : a population-based two-year follow-up study. / Mogard, E.; Lindqvist, E.; Bremander, A.; Bergman, S.

In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, Vol. 48, No. 6, 11.2019, p. 460-468.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Risk factors for development and persistence of chronic widespread pain in spondyloarthritis

T2 - a population-based two-year follow-up study

AU - Mogard, E.

AU - Lindqvist, E.

AU - Bremander, A.

AU - Bergman, S.

PY - 2019/11

Y1 - 2019/11

N2 - Objective: To study chronic widespread pain (CWP) over time in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA), and to identify risk factors for development and persistence of CWP. Methods: In this cohort study with baseline and 2.5 year follow-up postal surveys, patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and undifferentiated spondyloarthritis (USpA) (47% women) answered questions regarding pain, and were categorized as no chronic pain (NCP), chronic regional pain (CRP), or CWP. For each risk factor candidate (disease duration, body mass index, smoking, and patient-reported outcome measures), logistic regression analyses with CWP as the main outcome were performed separately, together with a basic model including age, gender, and SpA subgroup. Results: Altogether, 644 patients could be categorized at both time-points, yielding similar prevalence estimates at baseline and follow-up, although 38% transitioned between pain groups. Risk factors (odds ratio; 95% confidence interval) for development of CWP included more pain regions (1.36; 1.20‒1.53), higher pain intensity (1.35; 1.20‒1.52), worse fatigue (1.25; 1.13‒1.38), and worse global health (1.35; 1.19‒1.54). Persistent CWP was reported by 72%. In addition to factors predicting development of CWP, higher age (1.02; 1.00‒1.04), female gender (1.82; 1.06‒3.10), and anxiety (1.07; 1.00–1.14) also predicted persistence. Conclusion: The prevalence of CWP remained high over time, but with individual transitions between the pain groups. The development and persistence of CWP were predicted by more pain and worse health, with the addition of female gender and higher age for persistent CWP. Special attention and treatment alternatives for patients with SpA and concomitant CWP are essential in the clinic.

AB - Objective: To study chronic widespread pain (CWP) over time in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA), and to identify risk factors for development and persistence of CWP. Methods: In this cohort study with baseline and 2.5 year follow-up postal surveys, patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and undifferentiated spondyloarthritis (USpA) (47% women) answered questions regarding pain, and were categorized as no chronic pain (NCP), chronic regional pain (CRP), or CWP. For each risk factor candidate (disease duration, body mass index, smoking, and patient-reported outcome measures), logistic regression analyses with CWP as the main outcome were performed separately, together with a basic model including age, gender, and SpA subgroup. Results: Altogether, 644 patients could be categorized at both time-points, yielding similar prevalence estimates at baseline and follow-up, although 38% transitioned between pain groups. Risk factors (odds ratio; 95% confidence interval) for development of CWP included more pain regions (1.36; 1.20‒1.53), higher pain intensity (1.35; 1.20‒1.52), worse fatigue (1.25; 1.13‒1.38), and worse global health (1.35; 1.19‒1.54). Persistent CWP was reported by 72%. In addition to factors predicting development of CWP, higher age (1.02; 1.00‒1.04), female gender (1.82; 1.06‒3.10), and anxiety (1.07; 1.00–1.14) also predicted persistence. Conclusion: The prevalence of CWP remained high over time, but with individual transitions between the pain groups. The development and persistence of CWP were predicted by more pain and worse health, with the addition of female gender and higher age for persistent CWP. Special attention and treatment alternatives for patients with SpA and concomitant CWP are essential in the clinic.

U2 - 10.1080/03009742.2019.1602163

DO - 10.1080/03009742.2019.1602163

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31244357

AN - SCOPUS:85068171857

VL - 48

SP - 460

EP - 468

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology

SN - 0300-9742

IS - 6

ER -