Reduced ability to work both before and after infectious spondylodiscitis in working-age patients

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: As little is known about the ability to work in patients with infectious spondylodiscitis, we compared the relation between the workforce before infection with that of a reference population and described the patients' ability to work after infection including predictors of return to work (RTW).

METHODS: We identified all patients aged 20-57 years treated for infectious spondylodiscitis January 1994-May 2009 at hospitals in Funen County, Denmark. The work status of each week from 2 years before until 2 years after index date was compared with that of a reference population. Time to RTW was described using cumulative incidence curves and univariate cause-specific Cox-regression analyses (hazard ratios - HRs).

RESULTS: Of 112 identified patients, 8 (7%) died within the first year and 48 (43%) were part of the workforce 1 year before index. Through the entire observation period, the patients had lower affiliation to the workforce compared with the reference population. During the observation period, the proportion of patients on permanent disability pension increased from 24% to 38% and the proportion of self-supporters decreased from 58% to 33%. Seventy-three per cent of the patients being part of the workforce 1 year before index returned to the workforce within the 2 year follow-up. Main predictor of RTW was being part of the workforce 1 year before index (HR = 7.8; CI: 2.4-25.3).

CONCLUSIONS: Patients with infectious spondylodiscitis were less likely to be part of the workforce before infection compared with a reference population and infection further lowered their ability to RTW.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInfectious Diseases
Volume49
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)95-103
ISSN2374-4235
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Discitis
Return to Work
Population
Observation
Pensions
Denmark
Regression Analysis
Incidence

Cite this

@article{e58f62232bbf48fd8c2882997ef1073c,
title = "Reduced ability to work both before and after infectious spondylodiscitis in working-age patients",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: As little is known about the ability to work in patients with infectious spondylodiscitis, we compared the relation between the workforce before infection with that of a reference population and described the patients' ability to work after infection including predictors of return to work (RTW).METHODS: We identified all patients aged 20-57 years treated for infectious spondylodiscitis January 1994-May 2009 at hospitals in Funen County, Denmark. The work status of each week from 2 years before until 2 years after index date was compared with that of a reference population. Time to RTW was described using cumulative incidence curves and univariate cause-specific Cox-regression analyses (hazard ratios - HRs).RESULTS: Of 112 identified patients, 8 (7{\%}) died within the first year and 48 (43{\%}) were part of the workforce 1 year before index. Through the entire observation period, the patients had lower affiliation to the workforce compared with the reference population. During the observation period, the proportion of patients on permanent disability pension increased from 24{\%} to 38{\%} and the proportion of self-supporters decreased from 58{\%} to 33{\%}. Seventy-three per cent of the patients being part of the workforce 1 year before index returned to the workforce within the 2 year follow-up. Main predictor of RTW was being part of the workforce 1 year before index (HR = 7.8; CI: 2.4-25.3).CONCLUSIONS: Patients with infectious spondylodiscitis were less likely to be part of the workforce before infection compared with a reference population and infection further lowered their ability to RTW.",
author = "Michala Kehrer and Jesper Hallas and Jesper B{\ae}lum and Jensen, {Th{\o}ger Gorm} and Court Pedersen and Lassen, {Annmarie Touborg}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1080/23744235.2016.1217348",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "95--103",
journal = "Infectious Diseases",
issn = "2374-4235",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "2",

}

Reduced ability to work both before and after infectious spondylodiscitis in working-age patients. / Kehrer, Michala; Hallas, Jesper; Bælum, Jesper; Jensen, Thøger Gorm; Pedersen, Court; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg.

In: Infectious Diseases, Vol. 49, No. 2, 2017, p. 95-103.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reduced ability to work both before and after infectious spondylodiscitis in working-age patients

AU - Kehrer, Michala

AU - Hallas, Jesper

AU - Bælum, Jesper

AU - Jensen, Thøger Gorm

AU - Pedersen, Court

AU - Lassen, Annmarie Touborg

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - BACKGROUND: As little is known about the ability to work in patients with infectious spondylodiscitis, we compared the relation between the workforce before infection with that of a reference population and described the patients' ability to work after infection including predictors of return to work (RTW).METHODS: We identified all patients aged 20-57 years treated for infectious spondylodiscitis January 1994-May 2009 at hospitals in Funen County, Denmark. The work status of each week from 2 years before until 2 years after index date was compared with that of a reference population. Time to RTW was described using cumulative incidence curves and univariate cause-specific Cox-regression analyses (hazard ratios - HRs).RESULTS: Of 112 identified patients, 8 (7%) died within the first year and 48 (43%) were part of the workforce 1 year before index. Through the entire observation period, the patients had lower affiliation to the workforce compared with the reference population. During the observation period, the proportion of patients on permanent disability pension increased from 24% to 38% and the proportion of self-supporters decreased from 58% to 33%. Seventy-three per cent of the patients being part of the workforce 1 year before index returned to the workforce within the 2 year follow-up. Main predictor of RTW was being part of the workforce 1 year before index (HR = 7.8; CI: 2.4-25.3).CONCLUSIONS: Patients with infectious spondylodiscitis were less likely to be part of the workforce before infection compared with a reference population and infection further lowered their ability to RTW.

AB - BACKGROUND: As little is known about the ability to work in patients with infectious spondylodiscitis, we compared the relation between the workforce before infection with that of a reference population and described the patients' ability to work after infection including predictors of return to work (RTW).METHODS: We identified all patients aged 20-57 years treated for infectious spondylodiscitis January 1994-May 2009 at hospitals in Funen County, Denmark. The work status of each week from 2 years before until 2 years after index date was compared with that of a reference population. Time to RTW was described using cumulative incidence curves and univariate cause-specific Cox-regression analyses (hazard ratios - HRs).RESULTS: Of 112 identified patients, 8 (7%) died within the first year and 48 (43%) were part of the workforce 1 year before index. Through the entire observation period, the patients had lower affiliation to the workforce compared with the reference population. During the observation period, the proportion of patients on permanent disability pension increased from 24% to 38% and the proportion of self-supporters decreased from 58% to 33%. Seventy-three per cent of the patients being part of the workforce 1 year before index returned to the workforce within the 2 year follow-up. Main predictor of RTW was being part of the workforce 1 year before index (HR = 7.8; CI: 2.4-25.3).CONCLUSIONS: Patients with infectious spondylodiscitis were less likely to be part of the workforce before infection compared with a reference population and infection further lowered their ability to RTW.

U2 - 10.1080/23744235.2016.1217348

DO - 10.1080/23744235.2016.1217348

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27636869

VL - 49

SP - 95

EP - 103

JO - Infectious Diseases

JF - Infectious Diseases

SN - 2374-4235

IS - 2

ER -