Previous rotator cuff repair increases the risk of revision surgery for periprosthetic joint infection after reverse shoulder arthroplasty

Marie L Jensen*, Steen L Jensen, Matthijs Bolder, Klaus W J Hanisch, Anne Kathrine B Sørensen, Bo S Olsen, Thomas Falstie-Jensen, Jeppe V Rasmussen

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have indicated an increased risk of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) in patients treated with reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) compared with patients treated with anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty. The reason for this is unclear but may be related to a high prevalence of previous rotator cuff repair in patients who are treated with RSA. The purpose of this study was to determine previous non-arthroplasty surgery as a risk factor for revision owing to PJI after RSA for cuff tear arthropathy, massive irreparable rotator cuff tears, or osteoarthritis.

METHODS: Data were retrieved from the Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry and medical records. We included 2217 patients who underwent RSA for cuff tear arthropathy, massive irreparable rotator cuff tears, or osteoarthritis between 2006 and 2019. PJI was defined as ≥3 of 5 tissue samples positive for the same bacteria or as definite or probable PJI evaluated based on criteria from the International Consensus Meeting. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to illustrate the unadjusted 14-year cumulative rates of revision. A Cox regression model was used to report hazard for revision owing to PJI. Results were adjusted for previous non-arthroplasty surgery, sex, diagnosis, and age.

RESULTS: Revision was performed in 88 shoulders (4.0%), of which 40 (1.8%) underwent revision owing to PJI. There were 272 patients (12.3%) who underwent previous rotator cuff repair, of whom 11 (4.0%) underwent revision owing to PJI. The 14-year cumulative rate of revision owing to PJI was 14.1% for patients with previous rotator cuff repair and 2.7% for patients without previous surgery. The adjusted hazard ratio for revision owing to PJI for patients with previous rotator cuff repair was 2.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.04-4.60) compared with patients without previous surgery.

CONCLUSION: There is an increased risk of revision owing to PJI after RSA for patients with previous rotator cuff repair. We recommend that patients with previous rotator cuff repair be regarded as high-risk patients when considering RSA.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery
Volume32
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)111-120
ISSN1058-2746
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2023

Keywords

  • Arthritis, Infectious/etiology
  • Arthroplasty, Replacement, Shoulder/adverse effects
  • Humans
  • Osteoarthritis/surgery
  • Prosthesis-Related Infections/etiology
  • Range of Motion, Articular
  • Reoperation
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Rotator Cuff Injuries/surgery
  • Rotator Cuff Tear Arthropathy/surgery
  • Shoulder Joint/surgery
  • Treatment Outcome

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