Predisposed to participate? The influence of family socio-economic background on children's sports participation and daily amount of physical activity

Glen Nielsen, Vivian Grønfeldt, Jan Toftegaard Støckel, Lars Bo Andersen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

From a Bourdieu-inspired understanding of how personal resources (‘capitals’) enable
certain practices in certain contexts, the links between families’ cultural, social and
economic capitals, and children’s daily physical activity were investigated in 500
suburban Danish schoolchildren using questionnaire data and accelerometer measures.
Family socio-economic position (SEP) was found to be positively associated with
children’s participation in organized sport, which could be explained by differences in
family capitals. By contrast, this study found no relationship between families’ SEP
and the amounts of general physical activity in children. This reflected the tendencies
for club-organized sport to contribute a relatively small amount to the overall amount
of physical activity in children, and for children of low SEP to be equally active in other
settings such as school-breaks, day care and neighbourhood playgrounds.
Original languageEnglish
JournalSport in Society
Volume15
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)1-27
Number of pages27
ISSN1743-0437
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Cite this

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title = "Predisposed to participate? The influence of family socio-economic background on children's sports participation and daily amount of physical activity",
abstract = "From a Bourdieu-inspired understanding of how personal resources (‘capitals’) enable certain practices in certain contexts, the links between families’ cultural, social and economic capitals, and children’s daily physical activity were investigated in 500 suburban Danish schoolchildren using questionnaire data and accelerometer measures. Family socio-economic position (SEP) was found to be positively associated with children’s participation in organized sport, which could be explained by differences in family capitals. By contrast, this study found no relationship between families’ SEP and the amounts of general physical activity in children. This reflected the tendencies for club-organized sport to contribute a relatively small amount to the overall amount of physical activity in children, and for children of low SEP to be equally active in other settings such as school-breaks, day care and neighbourhood playgrounds.",
author = "Glen Nielsen and Vivian Gr{\o}nfeldt and St{\o}ckel, {Jan Toftegaard} and Andersen, {Lars Bo}",
note = "Available online: 19 Dec 2011",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1080/03031853.2011.625271",
language = "English",
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journal = "Sport in Society",
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}

Predisposed to participate? The influence of family socio-economic background on children's sports participation and daily amount of physical activity. / Nielsen, Glen ; Grønfeldt, Vivian; Støckel, Jan Toftegaard; Andersen, Lars Bo.

In: Sport in Society, Vol. 15, No. 1, 2012, p. 1-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predisposed to participate? The influence of family socio-economic background on children's sports participation and daily amount of physical activity

AU - Nielsen, Glen

AU - Grønfeldt, Vivian

AU - Støckel, Jan Toftegaard

AU - Andersen, Lars Bo

N1 - Available online: 19 Dec 2011

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - From a Bourdieu-inspired understanding of how personal resources (‘capitals’) enable certain practices in certain contexts, the links between families’ cultural, social and economic capitals, and children’s daily physical activity were investigated in 500 suburban Danish schoolchildren using questionnaire data and accelerometer measures. Family socio-economic position (SEP) was found to be positively associated with children’s participation in organized sport, which could be explained by differences in family capitals. By contrast, this study found no relationship between families’ SEP and the amounts of general physical activity in children. This reflected the tendencies for club-organized sport to contribute a relatively small amount to the overall amount of physical activity in children, and for children of low SEP to be equally active in other settings such as school-breaks, day care and neighbourhood playgrounds.

AB - From a Bourdieu-inspired understanding of how personal resources (‘capitals’) enable certain practices in certain contexts, the links between families’ cultural, social and economic capitals, and children’s daily physical activity were investigated in 500 suburban Danish schoolchildren using questionnaire data and accelerometer measures. Family socio-economic position (SEP) was found to be positively associated with children’s participation in organized sport, which could be explained by differences in family capitals. By contrast, this study found no relationship between families’ SEP and the amounts of general physical activity in children. This reflected the tendencies for club-organized sport to contribute a relatively small amount to the overall amount of physical activity in children, and for children of low SEP to be equally active in other settings such as school-breaks, day care and neighbourhood playgrounds.

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