Personalising exercise recommendations for healthy cognition and mobility in ageing: time to consider one’s pre-existing function and genotype (Part 2)

Cindy K Barha, Ryan S Falck, Søren T Skou, Teresa Liu-Ambrose*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialResearchpeer-review

Abstract

As we outlined in Part 1, precise exercise recommendations remain elusive and effects of current recommendations are small to moderate. Increased precision of exercise prescriptions may greatly promote adoption, adherence and maximise benefits. Current scientific efforts seek to delineate what (e.g., type, duration, frequency and intensity) exercise should be recommended, when (e.g., midlife vs late life) it is most effective for cognition and for whom and how does exercise benefit cognition and mobility. Identifying moderators (e.g., who, when)—factors that either attenuate or amplify the effects of exercise—will enable precise recommendations for individuals with similar characteristics (i.e., subgroups).


In this two-part editorial series, we focus on for whom factors that may moderate the effect of exercise on cognitive function and mobility (figure 1). In Part 1, we discussed biological sex and gender. Here in Part 2, we focus on the impact of pre-existing physical and cognitive health as well as genetic polymorphisms.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume55
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)301-303
ISSN0306-3674
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3. Mar 2021

Keywords

  • aging/ageing
  • exercise
  • genetics

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