Performance measurements influence on medical scientists’ career strategies,

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearch

Abstract

The most infamous author-level performance indicator in academia is the h-index. Hirsch (2005) created it to measure both the productivity and the citation impact of a researcher's scholarly publications. The index quickly became one of the most popular indicators among researchers and policymakers since it is a relatively simple measure of research performance. However, a simple measure cannot incorporate the entire complexity of scholarly communication, or of the profile of an academic career. This study differs previous studies examining and discussing the h-index, criticizing its merits, and/or suggesting alternative measures. We accept the existence, and use of the h-index, but are critical towards it beingused as an impact indicator on its own. The study focuses on how individual researchers can in principle strategically optimize their own h-index, and on the strategies used by such “high h-index researchers”. The study uses publication data about 75 medical researchers to identify the researchers as either high h-index researchers, or low h-index researchers and to select relevant interviewees. The interviews focus on the researchers' career and their respective publication strategies (if any). Indications are that the high h-index researchers reflect on their performance measures, and work strategically with increasing their own performance in accordance with such measures, while the low h-index researchers are less conscious about such measures. Our study describes the differences between the two groups and discusses the implications of our findings
Original languageEnglish
Publication date7. Nov 2018
Publication statusPublished - 7. Nov 2018
EventNordic Workshop on Bibliometrics and Research Policy - University of Borås, Borås, Sweden
Duration: 7. Nov 20189. Nov 2018
Conference number: 23
https://www.hb.se/en/About-UB/Current/Events/Event/23rd-Nordic-workshop-on-bibliometrics-and-research-policy-2018/

Conference

ConferenceNordic Workshop on Bibliometrics and Research Policy
Number23
LocationUniversity of Borås
CountrySweden
CityBorås
Period07/11/201809/11/2018
Internet address

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performance measurement
career
performance
academic career
indication
productivity

Keywords

  • performance measurement
  • h-index
  • medical scientists

Cite this

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title = "Performance measurements influence on medical scientists’ career strategies,",
abstract = "The most infamous author-level performance indicator in academia is the h-index. Hirsch (2005) created it to measure both the productivity and the citation impact of a researcher's scholarly publications. The index quickly became one of the most popular indicators among researchers and policymakers since it is a relatively simple measure of research performance. However, a simple measure cannot incorporate the entire complexity of scholarly communication, or of the profile of an academic career. This study differs previous studies examining and discussing the h-index, criticizing its merits, and/or suggesting alternative measures. We accept the existence, and use of the h-index, but are critical towards it beingused as an impact indicator on its own. The study focuses on how individual researchers can in principle strategically optimize their own h-index, and on the strategies used by such “high h-index researchers”. The study uses publication data about 75 medical researchers to identify the researchers as either high h-index researchers, or low h-index researchers and to select relevant interviewees. The interviews focus on the researchers' career and their respective publication strategies (if any). Indications are that the high h-index researchers reflect on their performance measures, and work strategically with increasing their own performance in accordance with such measures, while the low h-index researchers are less conscious about such measures. Our study describes the differences between the two groups and discusses the implications of our findings",
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Henriksen, D, Dorch, BF, Vlachos, E, Deutz, DB & Wien, C 2018, 'Performance measurements influence on medical scientists’ career strategies,', Nordic Workshop on Bibliometrics and Research Policy, Borås, Sweden, 07/11/2018 - 09/11/2018.

Performance measurements influence on medical scientists’ career strategies, / Henriksen, Dorte; Dorch, Bertil F.; Vlachos, Evgenios; Deutz, Daniella Bayle; Wien, Charlotte.

2018. Abstract from Nordic Workshop on Bibliometrics and Research Policy, Borås, Sweden.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearch

TY - ABST

T1 - Performance measurements influence on medical scientists’ career strategies,

AU - Henriksen, Dorte

AU - Dorch, Bertil F.

AU - Vlachos, Evgenios

AU - Deutz, Daniella Bayle

AU - Wien, Charlotte

PY - 2018/11/7

Y1 - 2018/11/7

N2 - The most infamous author-level performance indicator in academia is the h-index. Hirsch (2005) created it to measure both the productivity and the citation impact of a researcher's scholarly publications. The index quickly became one of the most popular indicators among researchers and policymakers since it is a relatively simple measure of research performance. However, a simple measure cannot incorporate the entire complexity of scholarly communication, or of the profile of an academic career. This study differs previous studies examining and discussing the h-index, criticizing its merits, and/or suggesting alternative measures. We accept the existence, and use of the h-index, but are critical towards it beingused as an impact indicator on its own. The study focuses on how individual researchers can in principle strategically optimize their own h-index, and on the strategies used by such “high h-index researchers”. The study uses publication data about 75 medical researchers to identify the researchers as either high h-index researchers, or low h-index researchers and to select relevant interviewees. The interviews focus on the researchers' career and their respective publication strategies (if any). Indications are that the high h-index researchers reflect on their performance measures, and work strategically with increasing their own performance in accordance with such measures, while the low h-index researchers are less conscious about such measures. Our study describes the differences between the two groups and discusses the implications of our findings

AB - The most infamous author-level performance indicator in academia is the h-index. Hirsch (2005) created it to measure both the productivity and the citation impact of a researcher's scholarly publications. The index quickly became one of the most popular indicators among researchers and policymakers since it is a relatively simple measure of research performance. However, a simple measure cannot incorporate the entire complexity of scholarly communication, or of the profile of an academic career. This study differs previous studies examining and discussing the h-index, criticizing its merits, and/or suggesting alternative measures. We accept the existence, and use of the h-index, but are critical towards it beingused as an impact indicator on its own. The study focuses on how individual researchers can in principle strategically optimize their own h-index, and on the strategies used by such “high h-index researchers”. The study uses publication data about 75 medical researchers to identify the researchers as either high h-index researchers, or low h-index researchers and to select relevant interviewees. The interviews focus on the researchers' career and their respective publication strategies (if any). Indications are that the high h-index researchers reflect on their performance measures, and work strategically with increasing their own performance in accordance with such measures, while the low h-index researchers are less conscious about such measures. Our study describes the differences between the two groups and discusses the implications of our findings

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M3 - Conference abstract for conference

ER -

Henriksen D, Dorch BF, Vlachos E, Deutz DB, Wien C. Performance measurements influence on medical scientists’ career strategies,. 2018. Abstract from Nordic Workshop on Bibliometrics and Research Policy, Borås, Sweden.