Patient, Family Caregiver, and Nurse Involvement in End-of-Life Discussions During Palliative Chemotherapy: A Phenomenological Hermeneutic Study

Tine Ikander*, Karin B. Dieperink, Olfred Hansen, Mette Raunkiær

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate current nursing practice related to end-of-life discussions with incurable lung cancer patients and their family caregivers from the perspectives of patients, family caregivers, and nurses in an oncology outpatient clinic. This phenomenological hermeneutic study included nine patients, eight family caregivers, and 11 nurses. Data were collected using participant observation, informal and semi-structured individual or joint interviews with patients and family caregivers, and focus group interviews with nurses. A Ricoeur-inspired approach was used to analyze the data. Three themes were identified: (a) content of end-of-life discussions, (b) timing of end-of-life discussions, and (c) challenges in end-of-life discussions. End-of-life discussions were seldom initiated; when they were, it was often too late. Discussions addressed treatment, place of care, practical/economic concerns, and existential matters. The physical environment at the outpatient clinic, lack of continuity, and nurses’ instrumental task workloads and time pressure posed challenges to initiating end-of-life discussions.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Family Nursing
Volume28
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)31-42
ISSN1074-8407
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2022

Keywords

  • end-of-life discussions
  • family nursing
  • phenomenological/hermeneutical

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Patient, Family Caregiver, and Nurse Involvement in End-of-Life Discussions During Palliative Chemotherapy: A Phenomenological Hermeneutic Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this