Patient-controlled oral analgesia at acute abdominal pain

A before-and-after intervention study of pain management during hospital stay

Helen Schultz*, Line Abrahamsen, Lise Ewald Rekvad, Ulla Skræp, Tanja Schultz Larsen, Sören Möller, Ulla Krogstrup Tecedor, Niels Qvist

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Aim: To investigate the patient experience of pain management, when patient-controlled oral analgesia was compared with standard care for patients admitted to hospital with acute abdominal pain. The primary outcome measures were pain intensity and patient perception of care. Background: Pain management of patients admitted to hospital with acute abdominal pain can be insufficient. Patient involvement in health care has been seen to have benefits for patients. Methods: A before-and-after intervention study was conducted in an emergency department observation unit and a surgical department. Data were collected from a questionnaire (APS-POQ-R-D) with the six subscales: pain severity, perception of care, interference with activity, interference with emotions, side effects and patient-related barriers. Results: A total of 156 patients were included. During admission the median score (0–10 scale) for the pain intensity and patient perception of care subscale was 4 (p = 0.96) and 8 (p = 0.92), respectively, in both the control and intervention group. On the activity subscale, the median scores were 6 and 5 (p = 0.17); on the emotion subscale, the scores were 5 and 4 (p = 0.31); and on the side effect subscale, the scores were 3 and 4 (p = 0.18) in the control and intervention group, respectively. Overall, the score was 5–8 at one item about being allowed to participate in decisions about pain treatment as much as wanted. Conclusion: Patient-controlled oral analgesia did not improve patient experience of pain management for patients admitted to hospital with acute abdominal pain.

Original languageEnglish
JournalApplied Nursing Research
Volume46
Pages (from-to)43-49
ISSN0897-1897
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2019

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Patient-Controlled Analgesia
Acute Pain
Pain Management
Length of Stay
Patient Participation
Control Groups
Hospital Emergency Service
Observation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Acute pain
  • Pain management
  • Patient involvement
  • Patient-centered care
  • Revised American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire, APS-POQ-R
  • Self-administered medication

Cite this

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title = "Patient-controlled oral analgesia at acute abdominal pain: A before-and-after intervention study of pain management during hospital stay",
abstract = "Aim: To investigate the patient experience of pain management, when patient-controlled oral analgesia was compared with standard care for patients admitted to hospital with acute abdominal pain. The primary outcome measures were pain intensity and patient perception of care. Background: Pain management of patients admitted to hospital with acute abdominal pain can be insufficient. Patient involvement in health care has been seen to have benefits for patients. Methods: A before-and-after intervention study was conducted in an emergency department observation unit and a surgical department. Data were collected from a questionnaire (APS-POQ-R-D) with the six subscales: pain severity, perception of care, interference with activity, interference with emotions, side effects and patient-related barriers. Results: A total of 156 patients were included. During admission the median score (0–10 scale) for the pain intensity and patient perception of care subscale was 4 (p = 0.96) and 8 (p = 0.92), respectively, in both the control and intervention group. On the activity subscale, the median scores were 6 and 5 (p = 0.17); on the emotion subscale, the scores were 5 and 4 (p = 0.31); and on the side effect subscale, the scores were 3 and 4 (p = 0.18) in the control and intervention group, respectively. Overall, the score was 5–8 at one item about being allowed to participate in decisions about pain treatment as much as wanted. Conclusion: Patient-controlled oral analgesia did not improve patient experience of pain management for patients admitted to hospital with acute abdominal pain.",
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author = "Helen Schultz and Line Abrahamsen and Rekvad, {Lise Ewald} and Ulla Skr{\ae}p and {Schultz Larsen}, Tanja and S{\"o}ren M{\"o}ller and Tecedor, {Ulla Krogstrup} and Niels Qvist",
year = "2019",
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language = "English",
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journal = "Applied Nursing Research",
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Patient-controlled oral analgesia at acute abdominal pain : A before-and-after intervention study of pain management during hospital stay. / Schultz, Helen; Abrahamsen, Line; Rekvad, Lise Ewald; Skræp, Ulla; Schultz Larsen, Tanja; Möller, Sören; Tecedor, Ulla Krogstrup; Qvist, Niels.

In: Applied Nursing Research, Vol. 46, 04.2019, p. 43-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patient-controlled oral analgesia at acute abdominal pain

T2 - A before-and-after intervention study of pain management during hospital stay

AU - Schultz, Helen

AU - Abrahamsen, Line

AU - Rekvad, Lise Ewald

AU - Skræp, Ulla

AU - Schultz Larsen, Tanja

AU - Möller, Sören

AU - Tecedor, Ulla Krogstrup

AU - Qvist, Niels

PY - 2019/4

Y1 - 2019/4

N2 - Aim: To investigate the patient experience of pain management, when patient-controlled oral analgesia was compared with standard care for patients admitted to hospital with acute abdominal pain. The primary outcome measures were pain intensity and patient perception of care. Background: Pain management of patients admitted to hospital with acute abdominal pain can be insufficient. Patient involvement in health care has been seen to have benefits for patients. Methods: A before-and-after intervention study was conducted in an emergency department observation unit and a surgical department. Data were collected from a questionnaire (APS-POQ-R-D) with the six subscales: pain severity, perception of care, interference with activity, interference with emotions, side effects and patient-related barriers. Results: A total of 156 patients were included. During admission the median score (0–10 scale) for the pain intensity and patient perception of care subscale was 4 (p = 0.96) and 8 (p = 0.92), respectively, in both the control and intervention group. On the activity subscale, the median scores were 6 and 5 (p = 0.17); on the emotion subscale, the scores were 5 and 4 (p = 0.31); and on the side effect subscale, the scores were 3 and 4 (p = 0.18) in the control and intervention group, respectively. Overall, the score was 5–8 at one item about being allowed to participate in decisions about pain treatment as much as wanted. Conclusion: Patient-controlled oral analgesia did not improve patient experience of pain management for patients admitted to hospital with acute abdominal pain.

AB - Aim: To investigate the patient experience of pain management, when patient-controlled oral analgesia was compared with standard care for patients admitted to hospital with acute abdominal pain. The primary outcome measures were pain intensity and patient perception of care. Background: Pain management of patients admitted to hospital with acute abdominal pain can be insufficient. Patient involvement in health care has been seen to have benefits for patients. Methods: A before-and-after intervention study was conducted in an emergency department observation unit and a surgical department. Data were collected from a questionnaire (APS-POQ-R-D) with the six subscales: pain severity, perception of care, interference with activity, interference with emotions, side effects and patient-related barriers. Results: A total of 156 patients were included. During admission the median score (0–10 scale) for the pain intensity and patient perception of care subscale was 4 (p = 0.96) and 8 (p = 0.92), respectively, in both the control and intervention group. On the activity subscale, the median scores were 6 and 5 (p = 0.17); on the emotion subscale, the scores were 5 and 4 (p = 0.31); and on the side effect subscale, the scores were 3 and 4 (p = 0.18) in the control and intervention group, respectively. Overall, the score was 5–8 at one item about being allowed to participate in decisions about pain treatment as much as wanted. Conclusion: Patient-controlled oral analgesia did not improve patient experience of pain management for patients admitted to hospital with acute abdominal pain.

KW - Acute pain

KW - Pain management

KW - Patient involvement

KW - Patient-centered care

KW - Revised American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire, APS-POQ-R

KW - Self-administered medication

U2 - 10.1016/j.apnr.2019.02.006

DO - 10.1016/j.apnr.2019.02.006

M3 - Journal article

VL - 46

SP - 43

EP - 49

JO - Applied Nursing Research

JF - Applied Nursing Research

SN - 0897-1897

ER -