Parents' Assessments of Disability in Their Children Using World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Child and Youth Version Joined Body Functions and Activity Codes Related to Everyday Life

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Abstract

AIM: To help parents assess disability in their own children using World Health Organization (WHO) International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Child and Youth Version (ICF-CY) code qualifier scoring and to assess the validity and reliability of the data sets obtained.

METHOD: Parents of 162 children with spina bifida, spinal muscular atrophy, muscular disorders, cerebral palsy, visual impairment, hearing impairment, mental disability, or disability following brain tumours performed scoring for 26 body functions qualifiers (b codes) and activities and participation qualifiers (d codes). Scoring was repeated after 6 months. Psychometric and Rasch data analysis was undertaken.

RESULTS: The initial and repeated data had Cronbach α of 0.96 and 0.97, respectively. Inter-code correlation was 0.54 (range: 0.23-0.91) and 0.76 (range: 0.20-0.92). The corrected code-total correlations were 0.72 (range: 0.49-0.83) and 0.75 (range: 0.50-0.87). When repeated, the ICF-CY code qualifier scoring showed a correlation R of 0.90. Rasch analysis of the selected ICF-CY code data demonstrated a mean measure of 0.00 and 0.00, respectively. Code qualifier infit mean square (MNSQ) had a mean of 1.01 and 1.00. The mean corresponding outfit MNSQ was 1.05 and 1.01. The ICF-CY code τ thresholds and category measures were continuous when assessed and reassessed by parents. Participating children had a mean of 56 codes scores (range: 26-130) before and a mean of 55.9 scores (range: 25-125) after repeat. Corresponding measures were -1.10 (range: -5.31 to 5.25) and -1.11 (range: -5.42 to 5.36), respectively. Based on measures obtained at the 2 occasions, the correlation coefficient R was 0.84. The child code map showed coherence of ICF-CY codes at each level. There was continuity in covering the range across disabilities. And, first and foremost, the distribution of codes reflexed a true continuity in disability with codes for motor functions activated first, then codes for cognitive functions, and, finally, codes for more complex functions.

CONCLUSIONS: Parents can assess their own children in a valid and reliable way, and if the WHO ICF-CY second-level code data set is functioning in a clinically sound way, it can be employed as a tool for identifying the severity of disabilities and for monitoring changes in those disabilities over time. The ICF-CY codes selected in this study might be one cornerstone in forming a national or even international generic set of ICF-CY codes for the benefit of children with disabilities, their parents, and caregivers and for the whole community supporting with children with disabilities on a daily and perpetual basis.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1179556517715037
JournalClinical Medicine Insights: Pediatrics
Volume11
Number of pages11
ISSN1179-5565
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Parents
Disabled Children
Spinal Dysraphism
Cerebral Palsy
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Cognition
Caregivers
Datasets

Keywords

  • Journal Article

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@article{b8053ba8594f4ed6b8c83e2940713402,
title = "Parents' Assessments of Disability in Their Children Using World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Child and Youth Version Joined Body Functions and Activity Codes Related to Everyday Life",
abstract = "AIM: To help parents assess disability in their own children using World Health Organization (WHO) International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Child and Youth Version (ICF-CY) code qualifier scoring and to assess the validity and reliability of the data sets obtained.METHOD: Parents of 162 children with spina bifida, spinal muscular atrophy, muscular disorders, cerebral palsy, visual impairment, hearing impairment, mental disability, or disability following brain tumours performed scoring for 26 body functions qualifiers (b codes) and activities and participation qualifiers (d codes). Scoring was repeated after 6 months. Psychometric and Rasch data analysis was undertaken.RESULTS: The initial and repeated data had Cronbach α of 0.96 and 0.97, respectively. Inter-code correlation was 0.54 (range: 0.23-0.91) and 0.76 (range: 0.20-0.92). The corrected code-total correlations were 0.72 (range: 0.49-0.83) and 0.75 (range: 0.50-0.87). When repeated, the ICF-CY code qualifier scoring showed a correlation R of 0.90. Rasch analysis of the selected ICF-CY code data demonstrated a mean measure of 0.00 and 0.00, respectively. Code qualifier infit mean square (MNSQ) had a mean of 1.01 and 1.00. The mean corresponding outfit MNSQ was 1.05 and 1.01. The ICF-CY code τ thresholds and category measures were continuous when assessed and reassessed by parents. Participating children had a mean of 56 codes scores (range: 26-130) before and a mean of 55.9 scores (range: 25-125) after repeat. Corresponding measures were -1.10 (range: -5.31 to 5.25) and -1.11 (range: -5.42 to 5.36), respectively. Based on measures obtained at the 2 occasions, the correlation coefficient R was 0.84. The child code map showed coherence of ICF-CY codes at each level. There was continuity in covering the range across disabilities. And, first and foremost, the distribution of codes reflexed a true continuity in disability with codes for motor functions activated first, then codes for cognitive functions, and, finally, codes for more complex functions.CONCLUSIONS: Parents can assess their own children in a valid and reliable way, and if the WHO ICF-CY second-level code data set is functioning in a clinically sound way, it can be employed as a tool for identifying the severity of disabilities and for monitoring changes in those disabilities over time. The ICF-CY codes selected in this study might be one cornerstone in forming a national or even international generic set of ICF-CY codes for the benefit of children with disabilities, their parents, and caregivers and for the whole community supporting with children with disabilities on a daily and perpetual basis.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Illum, {Niels Ove} and Gradel, {Kim Oren}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1177/1179556517715037",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
journal = "Clinical Medicine Insights: Pediatrics",
issn = "1179-5565",
publisher = "Libertas Academica Ltd.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Parents' Assessments of Disability in Their Children Using World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Child and Youth Version Joined Body Functions and Activity Codes Related to Everyday Life

AU - Illum, Niels Ove

AU - Gradel, Kim Oren

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - AIM: To help parents assess disability in their own children using World Health Organization (WHO) International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Child and Youth Version (ICF-CY) code qualifier scoring and to assess the validity and reliability of the data sets obtained.METHOD: Parents of 162 children with spina bifida, spinal muscular atrophy, muscular disorders, cerebral palsy, visual impairment, hearing impairment, mental disability, or disability following brain tumours performed scoring for 26 body functions qualifiers (b codes) and activities and participation qualifiers (d codes). Scoring was repeated after 6 months. Psychometric and Rasch data analysis was undertaken.RESULTS: The initial and repeated data had Cronbach α of 0.96 and 0.97, respectively. Inter-code correlation was 0.54 (range: 0.23-0.91) and 0.76 (range: 0.20-0.92). The corrected code-total correlations were 0.72 (range: 0.49-0.83) and 0.75 (range: 0.50-0.87). When repeated, the ICF-CY code qualifier scoring showed a correlation R of 0.90. Rasch analysis of the selected ICF-CY code data demonstrated a mean measure of 0.00 and 0.00, respectively. Code qualifier infit mean square (MNSQ) had a mean of 1.01 and 1.00. The mean corresponding outfit MNSQ was 1.05 and 1.01. The ICF-CY code τ thresholds and category measures were continuous when assessed and reassessed by parents. Participating children had a mean of 56 codes scores (range: 26-130) before and a mean of 55.9 scores (range: 25-125) after repeat. Corresponding measures were -1.10 (range: -5.31 to 5.25) and -1.11 (range: -5.42 to 5.36), respectively. Based on measures obtained at the 2 occasions, the correlation coefficient R was 0.84. The child code map showed coherence of ICF-CY codes at each level. There was continuity in covering the range across disabilities. And, first and foremost, the distribution of codes reflexed a true continuity in disability with codes for motor functions activated first, then codes for cognitive functions, and, finally, codes for more complex functions.CONCLUSIONS: Parents can assess their own children in a valid and reliable way, and if the WHO ICF-CY second-level code data set is functioning in a clinically sound way, it can be employed as a tool for identifying the severity of disabilities and for monitoring changes in those disabilities over time. The ICF-CY codes selected in this study might be one cornerstone in forming a national or even international generic set of ICF-CY codes for the benefit of children with disabilities, their parents, and caregivers and for the whole community supporting with children with disabilities on a daily and perpetual basis.

AB - AIM: To help parents assess disability in their own children using World Health Organization (WHO) International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Child and Youth Version (ICF-CY) code qualifier scoring and to assess the validity and reliability of the data sets obtained.METHOD: Parents of 162 children with spina bifida, spinal muscular atrophy, muscular disorders, cerebral palsy, visual impairment, hearing impairment, mental disability, or disability following brain tumours performed scoring for 26 body functions qualifiers (b codes) and activities and participation qualifiers (d codes). Scoring was repeated after 6 months. Psychometric and Rasch data analysis was undertaken.RESULTS: The initial and repeated data had Cronbach α of 0.96 and 0.97, respectively. Inter-code correlation was 0.54 (range: 0.23-0.91) and 0.76 (range: 0.20-0.92). The corrected code-total correlations were 0.72 (range: 0.49-0.83) and 0.75 (range: 0.50-0.87). When repeated, the ICF-CY code qualifier scoring showed a correlation R of 0.90. Rasch analysis of the selected ICF-CY code data demonstrated a mean measure of 0.00 and 0.00, respectively. Code qualifier infit mean square (MNSQ) had a mean of 1.01 and 1.00. The mean corresponding outfit MNSQ was 1.05 and 1.01. The ICF-CY code τ thresholds and category measures were continuous when assessed and reassessed by parents. Participating children had a mean of 56 codes scores (range: 26-130) before and a mean of 55.9 scores (range: 25-125) after repeat. Corresponding measures were -1.10 (range: -5.31 to 5.25) and -1.11 (range: -5.42 to 5.36), respectively. Based on measures obtained at the 2 occasions, the correlation coefficient R was 0.84. The child code map showed coherence of ICF-CY codes at each level. There was continuity in covering the range across disabilities. And, first and foremost, the distribution of codes reflexed a true continuity in disability with codes for motor functions activated first, then codes for cognitive functions, and, finally, codes for more complex functions.CONCLUSIONS: Parents can assess their own children in a valid and reliable way, and if the WHO ICF-CY second-level code data set is functioning in a clinically sound way, it can be employed as a tool for identifying the severity of disabilities and for monitoring changes in those disabilities over time. The ICF-CY codes selected in this study might be one cornerstone in forming a national or even international generic set of ICF-CY codes for the benefit of children with disabilities, their parents, and caregivers and for the whole community supporting with children with disabilities on a daily and perpetual basis.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1177/1179556517715037

DO - 10.1177/1179556517715037

M3 - Journal article

VL - 11

JO - Clinical Medicine Insights: Pediatrics

JF - Clinical Medicine Insights: Pediatrics

SN - 1179-5565

M1 - 1179556517715037

ER -