Outdoor time and physical activity increased after schoolyard renewal for the least-active children

Charlotte Skau Pawlowski, Henriette Bondo Andersen (Member of author group), Jasper Schipperijn (Member of author group)

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: It remains unclear if schoolyard interventions ‘just’ provide more opportunities for those who are already physically active. Drawing on a mix of methods, the aim was to investigate how a schoolyard renewal combined with organisational changes influenced recess physical activity behaviour for the least-active children.
Methods: Using a quasi-experimental pre-post study design, data were collected at six Danish schools during spring in 2014 and 2016. 553 children at baseline and 439 children (grade 4-9) after renewals wore accelerometer and GPS for five school days. Based on mean minutes of recess moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per child per school, the least-active children were defined as all children in the lowest activity quartile at baseline and follow-up, respectively. Five children included in the lowest activity quartile at follow-up also participated in interviews.
Results: 135 children (70 % girls) at baseline and 108 (76% girls) at follow-up were categorised as the least-active children. During recess, outdoor time (12.1 min/day) and physical activity (4.4 min/day) increased significantly post-renewal for the least-active children. Interviews revealed positive perceptions of the new schoolyard features and outdoor recess policy. However, socialising with friends was assigned a higher priority than type and location of recess activities.
Conclusion: Combining schoolyard renewals with organisational changes has led to the least-active children spending more time, and becoming slightly more physically activity in the schoolyard during recess. However, future intervention studies should investigate if socialising can be used effectively as motivating factor to further increase recess physical activity among the least-active children.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date6. Jun 2018
Publication statusPublished - 6. Jun 2018
EventAnnual Meeting of The International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity - Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Duration: 3. Jun 20186. Jun 2018
Conference number: 17th

Conference

ConferenceAnnual Meeting of The International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Number17th
CountryHong Kong
CityHong Kong
Period03/06/201806/06/2018

Cite this

Pawlowski, C. S., Andersen, H. B., & Schipperijn, J. (2018). Outdoor time and physical activity increased after schoolyard renewal for the least-active children. Abstract from Annual Meeting of The International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau ; Andersen, Henriette Bondo ; Schipperijn, Jasper. / Outdoor time and physical activity increased after schoolyard renewal for the least-active children. Abstract from Annual Meeting of The International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
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abstract = "Purpose: It remains unclear if schoolyard interventions ‘just’ provide more opportunities for those who are already physically active. Drawing on a mix of methods, the aim was to investigate how a schoolyard renewal combined with organisational changes influenced recess physical activity behaviour for the least-active children.Methods: Using a quasi-experimental pre-post study design, data were collected at six Danish schools during spring in 2014 and 2016. 553 children at baseline and 439 children (grade 4-9) after renewals wore accelerometer and GPS for five school days. Based on mean minutes of recess moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per child per school, the least-active children were defined as all children in the lowest activity quartile at baseline and follow-up, respectively. Five children included in the lowest activity quartile at follow-up also participated in interviews. Results: 135 children (70 {\%} girls) at baseline and 108 (76{\%} girls) at follow-up were categorised as the least-active children. During recess, outdoor time (12.1 min/day) and physical activity (4.4 min/day) increased significantly post-renewal for the least-active children. Interviews revealed positive perceptions of the new schoolyard features and outdoor recess policy. However, socialising with friends was assigned a higher priority than type and location of recess activities. Conclusion: Combining schoolyard renewals with organisational changes has led to the least-active children spending more time, and becoming slightly more physically activity in the schoolyard during recess. However, future intervention studies should investigate if socialising can be used effectively as motivating factor to further increase recess physical activity among the least-active children.",
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Outdoor time and physical activity increased after schoolyard renewal for the least-active children. / Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Andersen, Henriette Bondo (Member of author group); Schipperijn, Jasper (Member of author group).

2018. Abstract from Annual Meeting of The International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

TY - ABST

T1 - Outdoor time and physical activity increased after schoolyard renewal for the least-active children

AU - Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau

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Y1 - 2018/6/6

N2 - Purpose: It remains unclear if schoolyard interventions ‘just’ provide more opportunities for those who are already physically active. Drawing on a mix of methods, the aim was to investigate how a schoolyard renewal combined with organisational changes influenced recess physical activity behaviour for the least-active children.Methods: Using a quasi-experimental pre-post study design, data were collected at six Danish schools during spring in 2014 and 2016. 553 children at baseline and 439 children (grade 4-9) after renewals wore accelerometer and GPS for five school days. Based on mean minutes of recess moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per child per school, the least-active children were defined as all children in the lowest activity quartile at baseline and follow-up, respectively. Five children included in the lowest activity quartile at follow-up also participated in interviews. Results: 135 children (70 % girls) at baseline and 108 (76% girls) at follow-up were categorised as the least-active children. During recess, outdoor time (12.1 min/day) and physical activity (4.4 min/day) increased significantly post-renewal for the least-active children. Interviews revealed positive perceptions of the new schoolyard features and outdoor recess policy. However, socialising with friends was assigned a higher priority than type and location of recess activities. Conclusion: Combining schoolyard renewals with organisational changes has led to the least-active children spending more time, and becoming slightly more physically activity in the schoolyard during recess. However, future intervention studies should investigate if socialising can be used effectively as motivating factor to further increase recess physical activity among the least-active children.

AB - Purpose: It remains unclear if schoolyard interventions ‘just’ provide more opportunities for those who are already physically active. Drawing on a mix of methods, the aim was to investigate how a schoolyard renewal combined with organisational changes influenced recess physical activity behaviour for the least-active children.Methods: Using a quasi-experimental pre-post study design, data were collected at six Danish schools during spring in 2014 and 2016. 553 children at baseline and 439 children (grade 4-9) after renewals wore accelerometer and GPS for five school days. Based on mean minutes of recess moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per child per school, the least-active children were defined as all children in the lowest activity quartile at baseline and follow-up, respectively. Five children included in the lowest activity quartile at follow-up also participated in interviews. Results: 135 children (70 % girls) at baseline and 108 (76% girls) at follow-up were categorised as the least-active children. During recess, outdoor time (12.1 min/day) and physical activity (4.4 min/day) increased significantly post-renewal for the least-active children. Interviews revealed positive perceptions of the new schoolyard features and outdoor recess policy. However, socialising with friends was assigned a higher priority than type and location of recess activities. Conclusion: Combining schoolyard renewals with organisational changes has led to the least-active children spending more time, and becoming slightly more physically activity in the schoolyard during recess. However, future intervention studies should investigate if socialising can be used effectively as motivating factor to further increase recess physical activity among the least-active children.

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

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Pawlowski CS, Andersen HB, Schipperijn J. Outdoor time and physical activity increased after schoolyard renewal for the least-active children. 2018. Abstract from Annual Meeting of The International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.