North and south

long-run social mobility in England and attitudes toward welfare

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In this paper, we examine the long-run social mobility experience in England. We present evidence for surprisingly constant levels of social mobility over the period 1550–1749, despite huge structural changes. Examining regional differences, we show that the North of England exhibited higher rates of social mobility than the South. We link this to the hypothesis that historically high levels of social mobility can lead to a culture of non-acceptance of redistribution and welfare provision. Taking advantage of the fact that welfare provision was determined at the local level at the time, we are able to compare social mobility rates and welfare spending within a single country. Consistent with the hypothesis, we find evidence for historically higher levels of social mobility as well as lower welfare spending and less acceptance of redistribution in the North.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCliometrica
Volume12
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)251-276
ISSN1863-2505
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1. May 2018

Fingerprint

Social mobility
England
Social Mobility
Redistribution
Regional differences
Acceptance
Structural change
Structural Change

Keywords

  • England
  • Poor laws
  • Social mobility
  • Welfare

Cite this

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title = "North and south: long-run social mobility in England and attitudes toward welfare",
abstract = "In this paper, we examine the long-run social mobility experience in England. We present evidence for surprisingly constant levels of social mobility over the period 1550–1749, despite huge structural changes. Examining regional differences, we show that the North of England exhibited higher rates of social mobility than the South. We link this to the hypothesis that historically high levels of social mobility can lead to a culture of non-acceptance of redistribution and welfare provision. Taking advantage of the fact that welfare provision was determined at the local level at the time, we are able to compare social mobility rates and welfare spending within a single country. Consistent with the hypothesis, we find evidence for historically higher levels of social mobility as well as lower welfare spending and less acceptance of redistribution in the North.",
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North and south : long-run social mobility in England and attitudes toward welfare. / Boberg-Fazlic, Nina; Sharp, Paul Richard.

In: Cliometrica, Vol. 12, No. 2, 01.05.2018, p. 251-276.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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T2 - long-run social mobility in England and attitudes toward welfare

AU - Boberg-Fazlic, Nina

AU - Sharp, Paul Richard

PY - 2018/5/1

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N2 - In this paper, we examine the long-run social mobility experience in England. We present evidence for surprisingly constant levels of social mobility over the period 1550–1749, despite huge structural changes. Examining regional differences, we show that the North of England exhibited higher rates of social mobility than the South. We link this to the hypothesis that historically high levels of social mobility can lead to a culture of non-acceptance of redistribution and welfare provision. Taking advantage of the fact that welfare provision was determined at the local level at the time, we are able to compare social mobility rates and welfare spending within a single country. Consistent with the hypothesis, we find evidence for historically higher levels of social mobility as well as lower welfare spending and less acceptance of redistribution in the North.

AB - In this paper, we examine the long-run social mobility experience in England. We present evidence for surprisingly constant levels of social mobility over the period 1550–1749, despite huge structural changes. Examining regional differences, we show that the North of England exhibited higher rates of social mobility than the South. We link this to the hypothesis that historically high levels of social mobility can lead to a culture of non-acceptance of redistribution and welfare provision. Taking advantage of the fact that welfare provision was determined at the local level at the time, we are able to compare social mobility rates and welfare spending within a single country. Consistent with the hypothesis, we find evidence for historically higher levels of social mobility as well as lower welfare spending and less acceptance of redistribution in the North.

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