Need for improved diabetes support among people with psychiatric disorders and diabetes treated in psychiatric outpatient clinics: Results from a Danish cross-sectional study

Lenette Knudsen*, Dorte Lindqvist Hansen, Lene Eide Joensen, Rasmus Wibaek, Michael Eriksen Benros, Marit Eika Jørgensen, Gregers Stig Andersen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction People with psychiatric disorders have increased risk of premature death partly due to diabetes. This study aims to explore the quality of diabetes care, diabetes management, diabetes support and well-being of people with psychiatric disorders and diabetes. Research design and methods A total of 107 participants aged ≥18 years with diabetes and psychiatric disorders treated at psychiatric outpatient clinics in Denmark were recruited from August 2018 to June 2019. This descriptive cross-sectional study includes data from medical records on quality of diabetes care (eg, level and annual examination of hemoglobin A1c (HbA 1c)) and questionnaires on diabetes management (measured on items from the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Scale and diabetes distress based on Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale (PAID-5)), diabetes support (no, some or high support from eight potential support persons and experience of care actions measured on items from Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care) and well-being (WHO 5-Item Scale and self-rated general health). Results The mean age was 52 years, 56% were men, the mean body mass index was 31.9 kg/m 2, the median HbA 1c was 53 mmol/mol (7.0%) and the mean blood pressure was 131/83 mm Hg. The proportion with annual measurements of HbA 1c was 93%, blood pressure 80%, cholesterol 93%, foot examination 77% and eye examination 75%. Fifty-one per cent had high diabetes distress (PAID-5 score ≥8). Diabetologists and general practitioners (39% and 37%) were the health professionals most frequently reported to provide high diabetes support. Conclusions This study highlights a need for improved diabetes support in people with psychiatric disorders and diabetes. Although a high proportion received appropriate diabetes care, we found high levels of diabetes distress, moderate levels of optimal self-management behaviors, low well-being and low diabetes support from psychiatric health professionals, while one-third of the population found it relevant to receive diabetes support from psychiatric health professionals.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere002366
JournalBMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care
Volume10
Issue number1
ISSN2052-4897
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25. Jan 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • diabetes mellitus type 1
  • diabetes mellitus type 2
  • mental disorders
  • quality of health care

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