Muscle weakness, afferent sensory dysfunction and exercise in knee osteoarthritis

Ewa M. Roos, Walter Herzog, Joel A Block, Kim L Bennell, Medscape

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Lower-extremity muscle strength and afferent sensory dysfunction, such as reduced proprioceptive acuity, are potentially modifiable putative risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Findings from current studies suggest that muscle weakness is a predictor of knee OA onset, while there is conflicting evidence regarding the role of muscle weakness in OA progression. In contrast, the literature suggests a role for afferent sensory dysfunction in OA progression but not necessarily in OA onset. The few pilot exercise studies performed in patients who are at risk of incident OA indicate a possibility for achieving preventive structure or load modifications. In contrast, large randomized controlled trials of patients with established OA have failed to demonstrate beneficial effects of strengthening exercises. Subgroups of individuals who are at increased risk of knee OA (such as those with previous knee injuries) are easily identified, and may benefit from exercise interventions to prevent or delay OA onset.
Original languageEnglish
JournalNature reviews. Rheumatology
Volume7
Pages (from-to)57-63
Number of pages7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011

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Knee Osteoarthritis
Muscle Weakness
Exercise
Knee Injuries
Randomized Controlled Trials

Cite this

Roos, Ewa M. ; Herzog, Walter ; Block, Joel A ; Bennell, Kim L ; Medscape. / Muscle weakness, afferent sensory dysfunction and exercise in knee osteoarthritis. In: Nature reviews. Rheumatology. 2011 ; Vol. 7. pp. 57-63.
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Muscle weakness, afferent sensory dysfunction and exercise in knee osteoarthritis. / Roos, Ewa M.; Herzog, Walter; Block, Joel A; Bennell, Kim L; Medscape.

In: Nature reviews. Rheumatology, Vol. 7, 01.2011, p. 57-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

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