Mortality in asymptomatic vs. symptomatic patients surgically treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

Kirsten Riis Madsen, Uffe Bødtger

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPosterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction:
Compared to incidentally found lung cancer, the presence of symptoms (eg. cough, haemoptysis, pain, weight loss) at diagnosis is associated with a 50% reduction in median survival. In surgically treated patients, it is unknown whether presence of symptoms has prognostic significance.
Aim:
We wanted to ascertain if symptoms at time of NSCLC diagnosis lowered 12-months mortality after surgery.
Methods:
Retrospective analysis of all patients with localised NSCLC referred from our department between 2009-2011 for intended curative surgery
Data on age, sex, tobacco pack years, Charlson’s index of co-morbidity, FEV1, former malignancy, symptoms at time of diagnosis, pre- and post-surgical TNM stage, and 12-months mortality post-surgery were recorded.
Results:
130 patients were included: 51 (39%) asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic at NSCLC diagnosis with no differences concerning age, sex, tobacco pack years, or FEV1.
Former malignancy was significantly more prevalent among asymptomatic than symptomatic subjects (33 % vs. 11%), with insignificant differences in prevalence of other co-morbidities or in post-surgical TNM (82% vs 85% in stages IA-IIB).
12-months mortality was insignificantly higher in asymptomatic than symptomatic subjects (23% vs. 12%), and in patients with former malignancy compared to patients with no former cancer (17% vs. 16%).
Discussion:
Symptoms at diagnosis per se appear unrelated to mortality in patients with NSCLC referred for surgery. Asymptomatic patients were more likely to have had prior malignancy. This suggests that incidentally found NSCLC was more likely when other medical conditions required thoracic imaging.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date9. Sep 2013
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 9. Sep 2013
EventEuropean Respiratory Society Congress - Barcelona, Spain
Duration: 7. Sep 201311. Sep 2013

Conference

ConferenceEuropean Respiratory Society Congress
CountrySpain
CityBarcelona
Period07/09/201311/09/2013

Keywords

  • Lung cancer

Cite this

Madsen, K. R., & Bødtger, U. (2013). Mortality in asymptomatic vs. symptomatic patients surgically treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Poster session presented at European Respiratory Society Congress, Barcelona, Spain.
Madsen, Kirsten Riis ; Bødtger, Uffe. / Mortality in asymptomatic vs. symptomatic patients surgically treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Poster session presented at European Respiratory Society Congress, Barcelona, Spain.1 p.
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title = "Mortality in asymptomatic vs. symptomatic patients surgically treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)",
abstract = "Introduction: Compared to incidentally found lung cancer, the presence of symptoms (eg. cough, haemoptysis, pain, weight loss) at diagnosis is associated with a 50{\%} reduction in median survival. In surgically treated patients, it is unknown whether presence of symptoms has prognostic significance. Aim: We wanted to ascertain if symptoms at time of NSCLC diagnosis lowered 12-months mortality after surgery. Methods: Retrospective analysis of all patients with localised NSCLC referred from our department between 2009-2011 for intended curative surgery Data on age, sex, tobacco pack years, Charlson’s index of co-morbidity, FEV1, former malignancy, symptoms at time of diagnosis, pre- and post-surgical TNM stage, and 12-months mortality post-surgery were recorded. Results: 130 patients were included: 51 (39{\%}) asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic at NSCLC diagnosis with no differences concerning age, sex, tobacco pack years, or FEV1. Former malignancy was significantly more prevalent among asymptomatic than symptomatic subjects (33 {\%} vs. 11{\%}), with insignificant differences in prevalence of other co-morbidities or in post-surgical TNM (82{\%} vs 85{\%} in stages IA-IIB). 12-months mortality was insignificantly higher in asymptomatic than symptomatic subjects (23{\%} vs. 12{\%}), and in patients with former malignancy compared to patients with no former cancer (17{\%} vs. 16{\%}). Discussion: Symptoms at diagnosis per se appear unrelated to mortality in patients with NSCLC referred for surgery. Asymptomatic patients were more likely to have had prior malignancy. This suggests that incidentally found NSCLC was more likely when other medical conditions required thoracic imaging.",
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Madsen, KR & Bødtger, U 2013, 'Mortality in asymptomatic vs. symptomatic patients surgically treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)' European Respiratory Society Congress, Barcelona, Spain, 07/09/2013 - 11/09/2013, .

Mortality in asymptomatic vs. symptomatic patients surgically treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). / Madsen, Kirsten Riis; Bødtger, Uffe.

2013. Poster session presented at European Respiratory Society Congress, Barcelona, Spain.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPosterResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - Mortality in asymptomatic vs. symptomatic patients surgically treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

AU - Madsen, Kirsten Riis

AU - Bødtger, Uffe

PY - 2013/9/9

Y1 - 2013/9/9

N2 - Introduction: Compared to incidentally found lung cancer, the presence of symptoms (eg. cough, haemoptysis, pain, weight loss) at diagnosis is associated with a 50% reduction in median survival. In surgically treated patients, it is unknown whether presence of symptoms has prognostic significance. Aim: We wanted to ascertain if symptoms at time of NSCLC diagnosis lowered 12-months mortality after surgery. Methods: Retrospective analysis of all patients with localised NSCLC referred from our department between 2009-2011 for intended curative surgery Data on age, sex, tobacco pack years, Charlson’s index of co-morbidity, FEV1, former malignancy, symptoms at time of diagnosis, pre- and post-surgical TNM stage, and 12-months mortality post-surgery were recorded. Results: 130 patients were included: 51 (39%) asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic at NSCLC diagnosis with no differences concerning age, sex, tobacco pack years, or FEV1. Former malignancy was significantly more prevalent among asymptomatic than symptomatic subjects (33 % vs. 11%), with insignificant differences in prevalence of other co-morbidities or in post-surgical TNM (82% vs 85% in stages IA-IIB). 12-months mortality was insignificantly higher in asymptomatic than symptomatic subjects (23% vs. 12%), and in patients with former malignancy compared to patients with no former cancer (17% vs. 16%). Discussion: Symptoms at diagnosis per se appear unrelated to mortality in patients with NSCLC referred for surgery. Asymptomatic patients were more likely to have had prior malignancy. This suggests that incidentally found NSCLC was more likely when other medical conditions required thoracic imaging.

AB - Introduction: Compared to incidentally found lung cancer, the presence of symptoms (eg. cough, haemoptysis, pain, weight loss) at diagnosis is associated with a 50% reduction in median survival. In surgically treated patients, it is unknown whether presence of symptoms has prognostic significance. Aim: We wanted to ascertain if symptoms at time of NSCLC diagnosis lowered 12-months mortality after surgery. Methods: Retrospective analysis of all patients with localised NSCLC referred from our department between 2009-2011 for intended curative surgery Data on age, sex, tobacco pack years, Charlson’s index of co-morbidity, FEV1, former malignancy, symptoms at time of diagnosis, pre- and post-surgical TNM stage, and 12-months mortality post-surgery were recorded. Results: 130 patients were included: 51 (39%) asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic at NSCLC diagnosis with no differences concerning age, sex, tobacco pack years, or FEV1. Former malignancy was significantly more prevalent among asymptomatic than symptomatic subjects (33 % vs. 11%), with insignificant differences in prevalence of other co-morbidities or in post-surgical TNM (82% vs 85% in stages IA-IIB). 12-months mortality was insignificantly higher in asymptomatic than symptomatic subjects (23% vs. 12%), and in patients with former malignancy compared to patients with no former cancer (17% vs. 16%). Discussion: Symptoms at diagnosis per se appear unrelated to mortality in patients with NSCLC referred for surgery. Asymptomatic patients were more likely to have had prior malignancy. This suggests that incidentally found NSCLC was more likely when other medical conditions required thoracic imaging.

KW - Lung cancer

M3 - Poster

ER -

Madsen KR, Bødtger U. Mortality in asymptomatic vs. symptomatic patients surgically treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). 2013. Poster session presented at European Respiratory Society Congress, Barcelona, Spain.