Microfluidic culture chamber for the long-term perfusion and precise chemical stimulation of organotypic brain tissue slices

H. H. Caicedo*, M. Vignes, B. Brugg, J. M. Peyrin

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    We have developed a microfluidic perfusion-based culture system to study long-term in-vitro responses of organo-typic brain slices exposed to localized neurochemical stimulation. Using this microperfusion chamber we show that hip-pocampal organotypic brain slices cultures grown on nitrocellulose membranes can be stimulated for up to 24 hours in our experimental setup while preserving tissue viability. By using fluorescent probe we show that a specific area of the hippocampal slice can be precisely targeted and stimulated. The device allows a virtual pixelisation of slice, precise control of the in-vitro micro environment, long-term culture of viable brain slices, and delivery of fluids to selected brain regions in a multiplexed and spatially defined manner.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publication14th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences 2010, MicroTAS 2010
    Number of pages3
    Volume3
    Publication date1. Dec 2010
    Pages1835-1837
    ISBN (Print)9781618390622
    Publication statusPublished - 1. Dec 2010
    Event14th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences 2010, MicroTAS 2010 - Groningen, Netherlands
    Duration: 3. Oct 20107. Oct 2010

    Conference

    Conference14th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences 2010, MicroTAS 2010
    Country/TerritoryNetherlands
    CityGroningen
    Period03/10/201007/10/2010

    Keywords

    • Localized neurochemical stimulation
    • Long-term perfusion
    • Microfluidics
    • Organotypic brain slice

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