MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY

Anorexia nervosa and endocrinology: a clinical update

René Klinkby Støving*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Anorexia nervosa is a syndrome, that is collections of symptoms, which is not defined by its etiology. The severe cases are intractable. The syndrome is associated with multiple, profound endocrine alterations which may be adaptive, reactive or etiologic. Adaptive changes potentially may be inappropriate in clinical settings such as inpatient intensive re-nutrition or in a setting with somatic comorbidity. Electrolyte levels must be closely monitored during the refeeding process, and the need for weight gain must be balanced against potentially fatal refeeding complications. An important focus of clinical research should be to identify biomarkers associated with different stages of weight loss and re-nutrition combined with psychometric data. Besides well-established peripheral endocrine actions, several hormones also are released directly to different brain areas, where they may exert behavioral and psychogenic actions that could offer therapeutic targets. We need reliable biomarkers for predicting outcome and to ensure safe re-nutrition, however, first of all we need them to explore the metabolism in anorexia nervosa to open new avenues with therapeutic targets. A breakthrough in our understanding and treatment of this whimsical disease remains. Considering this, the aim of the present review is to provide an updated overview of the many endocrine changes in a clinical perspective.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Endocrinology
Volume180
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)R9-R27
ISSN0804-4643
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1. Jan 2019

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Endocrinology
Psychometrics
Electrolytes
Weight Gain
Comorbidity
Inpatients
Hormones
Research

Keywords

  • Anorexia Nervosa/blood
  • Biomarkers/blood
  • Humans
  • Nutritional Status
  • Prognosis
  • Weight Gain/physiology

Cite this

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title = "MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY: Anorexia nervosa and endocrinology: a clinical update",
abstract = "Anorexia nervosa is a syndrome, that is collections of symptoms, which is not defined by its etiology. The severe cases are intractable. The syndrome is associated with multiple, profound endocrine alterations which may be adaptive, reactive or etiologic. Adaptive changes potentially may be inappropriate in clinical settings such as inpatient intensive re-nutrition or in a setting with somatic comorbidity. Electrolyte levels must be closely monitored during the refeeding process, and the need for weight gain must be balanced against potentially fatal refeeding complications. An important focus of clinical research should be to identify biomarkers associated with different stages of weight loss and re-nutrition combined with psychometric data. Besides well-established peripheral endocrine actions, several hormones also are released directly to different brain areas, where they may exert behavioral and psychogenic actions that could offer therapeutic targets. We need reliable biomarkers for predicting outcome and to ensure safe re-nutrition, however, first of all we need them to explore the metabolism in anorexia nervosa to open new avenues with therapeutic targets. A breakthrough in our understanding and treatment of this whimsical disease remains. Considering this, the aim of the present review is to provide an updated overview of the many endocrine changes in a clinical perspective.",
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MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY : Anorexia nervosa and endocrinology: a clinical update. / Støving, René Klinkby.

In: European Journal of Endocrinology, Vol. 180, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. R9-R27.

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

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