Mechanical properties, physiological behavior, and function of aponeurosis and tendon

Jens Bojsen-Møller*, S. Peter Magnusson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

Abstract

During human movement, the muscle and tendinous structures interact as a mechanical system in which forces are generated and transmitted to the bone and energy is stored and released to optimize function and economy of movement and/or to reduce risk of injury. The present review addresses certain aspects of how the anatomical design and mechanical and material properties of the force-transmitting tissues contribute to the function of the muscle-tendon unit and thus overall human function. The force-bearing tissues are examined from a structural macroscopic point of view down to the nanoscale level of the collagen fibril. In recent years, the understanding of in vivo mechanical function of the force-bearing tissues has increased, and it has become clear that these tissues adapt to loading and unloading and furthermore that force transmission mechanics is more complex than previously thought. Future investigations of the force-transmitting tissues in three dimensions will enable a greater understanding of the complex functional interplay between muscle and tendon, with relevance for performance, injury mechanisms, and rehabilitation strategies.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985)
Volume126
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)1800-1807
ISSN8750-7587
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1. Jun 2019

Fingerprint

Muscles
Wounds and Injuries
Mechanics

Keywords

  • force-transmitting tissues
  • muscle-tendon unit

Cite this

@article{e4c707b9cbb94529bc7e13f8d62cda2e,
title = "Mechanical properties, physiological behavior, and function of aponeurosis and tendon",
abstract = "During human movement, the muscle and tendinous structures interact as a mechanical system in which forces are generated and transmitted to the bone and energy is stored and released to optimize function and economy of movement and/or to reduce risk of injury. The present review addresses certain aspects of how the anatomical design and mechanical and material properties of the force-transmitting tissues contribute to the function of the muscle-tendon unit and thus overall human function. The force-bearing tissues are examined from a structural macroscopic point of view down to the nanoscale level of the collagen fibril. In recent years, the understanding of in vivo mechanical function of the force-bearing tissues has increased, and it has become clear that these tissues adapt to loading and unloading and furthermore that force transmission mechanics is more complex than previously thought. Future investigations of the force-transmitting tissues in three dimensions will enable a greater understanding of the complex functional interplay between muscle and tendon, with relevance for performance, injury mechanisms, and rehabilitation strategies.",
keywords = "force-transmitting tissues, muscle-tendon unit",
author = "Jens Bojsen-M{\o}ller and Magnusson, {S. Peter}",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1152/japplphysiol.00671.2018",
language = "English",
volume = "126",
pages = "1800--1807",
journal = "Journal of Applied Physiology",
issn = "8750-7587",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "6",

}

Mechanical properties, physiological behavior, and function of aponeurosis and tendon. / Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Magnusson, S. Peter.

In: Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), Vol. 126, No. 6, 01.06.2019, p. 1800-1807.

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mechanical properties, physiological behavior, and function of aponeurosis and tendon

AU - Bojsen-Møller, Jens

AU - Magnusson, S. Peter

PY - 2019/6/1

Y1 - 2019/6/1

N2 - During human movement, the muscle and tendinous structures interact as a mechanical system in which forces are generated and transmitted to the bone and energy is stored and released to optimize function and economy of movement and/or to reduce risk of injury. The present review addresses certain aspects of how the anatomical design and mechanical and material properties of the force-transmitting tissues contribute to the function of the muscle-tendon unit and thus overall human function. The force-bearing tissues are examined from a structural macroscopic point of view down to the nanoscale level of the collagen fibril. In recent years, the understanding of in vivo mechanical function of the force-bearing tissues has increased, and it has become clear that these tissues adapt to loading and unloading and furthermore that force transmission mechanics is more complex than previously thought. Future investigations of the force-transmitting tissues in three dimensions will enable a greater understanding of the complex functional interplay between muscle and tendon, with relevance for performance, injury mechanisms, and rehabilitation strategies.

AB - During human movement, the muscle and tendinous structures interact as a mechanical system in which forces are generated and transmitted to the bone and energy is stored and released to optimize function and economy of movement and/or to reduce risk of injury. The present review addresses certain aspects of how the anatomical design and mechanical and material properties of the force-transmitting tissues contribute to the function of the muscle-tendon unit and thus overall human function. The force-bearing tissues are examined from a structural macroscopic point of view down to the nanoscale level of the collagen fibril. In recent years, the understanding of in vivo mechanical function of the force-bearing tissues has increased, and it has become clear that these tissues adapt to loading and unloading and furthermore that force transmission mechanics is more complex than previously thought. Future investigations of the force-transmitting tissues in three dimensions will enable a greater understanding of the complex functional interplay between muscle and tendon, with relevance for performance, injury mechanisms, and rehabilitation strategies.

KW - force-transmitting tissues

KW - muscle-tendon unit

U2 - 10.1152/japplphysiol.00671.2018

DO - 10.1152/japplphysiol.00671.2018

M3 - Review

C2 - 30946635

AN - SCOPUS:85065889287

VL - 126

SP - 1800

EP - 1807

JO - Journal of Applied Physiology

JF - Journal of Applied Physiology

SN - 8750-7587

IS - 6

ER -