Management of neck pain and associated disorders: A clinical practice guideline from the Ontario Protocol for Traffic Injury Management (OPTIMa) Collaboration

Pierre Côté, Jessica j Wong, Deborah Sutton, Heather M Shearer, Silvano Mior, Kristi Randhawa, Arthur Ameis, Linda J Carroll, Margareta Nordin, Hainan Yu, Gail M. Lindsay, Danielle Southerst, Sharanya Varatharajan, Craig Jacobs, Maja Stupar, Anne Taylor-Vaisey, Gabrielle van der Velde, Douglas P Gross, Robert J Brison, Mike PauldenCarlo Ammendolia, J. David Cassidy, Patrick Loisel, Shawn Marshall, Richard N. Bohay, John Stapleton, Michel Lacerte, Murray Krahn, Roger Salhany

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

PURPOSE: To develop an evidence-based guideline for the management of grades I-III neck pain and associated disorders (NAD).

METHODS: This guideline is based on recent systematic reviews of high-quality studies. A multidisciplinary expert panel considered the evidence of effectiveness, safety, cost-effectiveness, societal and ethical values, and patient experiences (obtained from qualitative research) when formulating recommendations. Target audience includes clinicians; target population is adults with grades I-III NAD <6 months duration.

RECOMMENDATION 1: Clinicians should rule out major structural or other pathologies as the cause of NAD. Once major pathology has been ruled out, clinicians should classify NAD as grade I, II, or III.

RECOMMENDATION 2: Clinicians should assess prognostic factors for delayed recovery from NAD.

RECOMMENDATION 3: Clinicians should educate and reassure patients about the benign and self-limited nature of the typical course of NAD grades I-III and the importance of maintaining activity and movement. Patients with worsening symptoms and those who develop new physical or psychological symptoms should be referred to a physician for further evaluation at any time during their care.

RECOMMENDATION 4: For NAD grades I-II ≤3 months duration, clinicians may consider structured patient education in combination with: range of motion exercise, multimodal care (range of motion exercise with manipulation or mobilization), or muscle relaxants. In view of evidence of no effectiveness, clinicians should not offer structured patient education alone, strain-counterstrain therapy, relaxation massage, cervical collar, electroacupuncture, electrotherapy, or clinic-based heat.

RECOMMENDATION 5: For NAD grades I-II >3 months duration, clinicians may consider structured patient education in combination with: range of motion and strengthening exercises, qigong, yoga, multimodal care (exercise with manipulation or mobilization), clinical massage, low-level laser therapy, or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In view of evidence of no effectiveness, clinicians should not offer strengthening exercises alone, strain-counterstrain therapy, relaxation massage, relaxation therapy for pain or disability, electrotherapy, shortwave diathermy, clinic-based heat, electroacupuncture, or botulinum toxin injections.

RECOMMENDATION 6: For NAD grade III ≤3 months duration, clinicians may consider supervised strengthening exercises in addition to structured patient education. In view of evidence of no effectiveness, clinicians should not offer structured patient education alone, cervical collar, low-level laser therapy, or traction. RECOMMENDATION 7: For NAD grade III >3 months duration, clinicians should not offer a cervical collar. Patients who continue to experience neurological signs and disability more than 3 months after injury should be referred to a physician for investigation and management. RECOMMENDATION 8: Clinicians should reassess the patient at every visit to determine if additional care is necessary, the condition is worsening, or the patient has recovered. Patients reporting significant recovery should be discharged.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Spine Journal
Volume25
Issue number7
Pages (from-to)2000-2022
Number of pages23
ISSN0940-6719
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2016

Keywords

  • Clinical practice guideline
  • Disease management
  • Management
  • Neck pain
  • Practice guideline
  • Therapies
  • Therapy
  • Treatment
  • Whiplash
  • Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use
  • Neck Pain/therapy
  • Humans
  • Exercise Therapy
  • Relaxation Therapy
  • Cost-Benefit Analysis
  • Range of Motion, Articular
  • Physical Examination
  • Yoga
  • Massage
  • Ontario
  • Low-Level Light Therapy

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