Low pressure pain thresholds are associated with, but does not predispose for, low back pain

Søren O'Neill, Per Kjær, Thomas Graven Nielsen, Claus Manniche, Lars Arendt-Nielsen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Chronic pain is often associated with hyperalgesia in cross-sectional studies. In the present study, a random cohort of 40-year-old individuals (n = 264) from the general population was assessed for low back pain (LBP) status and pressure pain threshold (PPT), with follow-up assessment 4 and 8 years later. Low PPT at baseline as a potential risk factor for the development of LBP was investigated longitudinally and the association between LBP and hyperalgesia was studied cross-sectionally at baseline and 8-year follow-up. Generalized (p   0.08). Of the participants without recent or long-lasting LBP, those with a low PPT at baseline (lower 10% percentile) had no increased risk of developing LBP (p > 0.05). The findings indicate that PPT decreases as a consequence of long-lasting pain, whereas a low PPT seems not to constitute a separate risk factor for the development of LBP.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Spine Journal
Volume20
Issue number12
Pages (from-to)2120-2125
Number of pages6
ISSN0940-6719
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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Pain Threshold
Low Back Pain
Hyperalgesia
Chronic Pain
Cross-Sectional Studies
Population

Cite this

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title = "Low pressure pain thresholds are associated with, but does not predispose for, low back pain",
abstract = "Chronic pain is often associated with hyperalgesia in cross-sectional studies. In the present study, a random cohort of 40-year-old individuals (n = 264) from the general population was assessed for low back pain (LBP) status and pressure pain threshold (PPT), with follow-up assessment 4 and 8 years later. Low PPT at baseline as a potential risk factor for the development of LBP was investigated longitudinally and the association between LBP and hyperalgesia was studied cross-sectionally at baseline and 8-year follow-up. Generalized (p   0.08). Of the participants without recent or long-lasting LBP, those with a low PPT at baseline (lower 10{\%} percentile) had no increased risk of developing LBP (p > 0.05). The findings indicate that PPT decreases as a consequence of long-lasting pain, whereas a low PPT seems not to constitute a separate risk factor for the development of LBP.",
author = "S{\o}ren O'Neill and Per Kj{\ae}r and Nielsen, {Thomas Graven} and Claus Manniche and Lars Arendt-Nielsen",
note = "Published online: 22 April 2011",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1007/s00586-011-1796-4",
language = "English",
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journal = "European Spine Journal",
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Low pressure pain thresholds are associated with, but does not predispose for, low back pain. / O'Neill, Søren; Kjær, Per; Nielsen, Thomas Graven; Manniche, Claus; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars.

In: European Spine Journal, Vol. 20 , No. 12, 2011, p. 2120-2125.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Low pressure pain thresholds are associated with, but does not predispose for, low back pain

AU - O'Neill, Søren

AU - Kjær, Per

AU - Nielsen, Thomas Graven

AU - Manniche, Claus

AU - Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

N1 - Published online: 22 April 2011

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Chronic pain is often associated with hyperalgesia in cross-sectional studies. In the present study, a random cohort of 40-year-old individuals (n = 264) from the general population was assessed for low back pain (LBP) status and pressure pain threshold (PPT), with follow-up assessment 4 and 8 years later. Low PPT at baseline as a potential risk factor for the development of LBP was investigated longitudinally and the association between LBP and hyperalgesia was studied cross-sectionally at baseline and 8-year follow-up. Generalized (p   0.08). Of the participants without recent or long-lasting LBP, those with a low PPT at baseline (lower 10% percentile) had no increased risk of developing LBP (p > 0.05). The findings indicate that PPT decreases as a consequence of long-lasting pain, whereas a low PPT seems not to constitute a separate risk factor for the development of LBP.

AB - Chronic pain is often associated with hyperalgesia in cross-sectional studies. In the present study, a random cohort of 40-year-old individuals (n = 264) from the general population was assessed for low back pain (LBP) status and pressure pain threshold (PPT), with follow-up assessment 4 and 8 years later. Low PPT at baseline as a potential risk factor for the development of LBP was investigated longitudinally and the association between LBP and hyperalgesia was studied cross-sectionally at baseline and 8-year follow-up. Generalized (p   0.08). Of the participants without recent or long-lasting LBP, those with a low PPT at baseline (lower 10% percentile) had no increased risk of developing LBP (p > 0.05). The findings indicate that PPT decreases as a consequence of long-lasting pain, whereas a low PPT seems not to constitute a separate risk factor for the development of LBP.

U2 - 10.1007/s00586-011-1796-4

DO - 10.1007/s00586-011-1796-4

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 21512842

VL - 20

SP - 2120

EP - 2125

JO - European Spine Journal

JF - European Spine Journal

SN - 0940-6719

IS - 12

ER -