Long-Term Selenium-Yeast Supplementation Does Not Affect Bone Turnover Markers: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

Giorgia Perri*, Tom R. Hill, John C. Mathers, Jennifer S. Walsh, Fatma Gossiel, Kristian Winther, Jacob Frölich, Lars Folkestad, Søren Cold, Richard Eastell

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Higher selenium status has been associated with lower bone turnover markers (BTM) in epidemiological studies. However, the long-term impact of selenium supplementation on BTMs has not been studied. We investigated the effects of selenium supplementation on BTMs including osteocalcin (OC), procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (PINP), collagen type I cross-linked C-telopeptide (CTX), and bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP) in the short (6 months) and long term (5 years). A total of 481 Danish men and women (60–74 years) were randomized to receive placebo-yeast versus 100, 200, or 300 μg selenium as selenium-enriched yeast daily for 5 years. Plasma selenium concentration was measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and BTMs were measured in nonfasted samples at baseline, 6 months, and 5 years. Data were analyzed by ANCOVA to investigate the shape of the dose-response relationships. Covariates included age, body mass index, baseline selenium status, baseline BTM, smoking, alcohol, supplement use, and medication. Plasma selenium concentration (mean 86.5 μg/d at baseline) increased significantly with increasing selenium supplementation to 152.6, 209.1, and 253.7 μg/L after 6 months and remained elevated at 5 years (158.4, 222.4, and 275.9 μg/L for 100, 200, and 300 μg supplemental selenium/d, respectively (p < 0.001)). There was no change in plasma selenium concentration in the placebo-treated group. There was no significant effect of selenium supplementation on OC (6 months p = 0.37; 5 years p = 0.63), PINP (6 months p = 0.37; 5 years p = 0.79), CTX (6 months p = 0.91; 5 years p = 0.58) or BALP (6 months p = 0.17; 5 years p = 0.53). The relatively replete baseline selenium status in the study participants may explain this lack of effect. Testing in more deficient populations may provide further insights into the impact of selenium supplementation on bone health.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Bone and Mineral Research
Volume37
Issue number11
Pages (from-to)2165-2173
ISSN0884-0431
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Authors. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR).

Keywords

  • BIOCHEMICAL MARKERS OF BONE TURNOVER
  • GENERAL POPULATION STUDIES
  • NUTRITION

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