Like an ace up the sleeve an interview study of nurses´ experiences of the contact with relatives in a somatic emergency ward

Eva Hoffmann, Pia Riis Olsen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Research indicates that active involvement of patients′ relatives generally has a positive impact on patients′ hospitalisation, including patient safety. Campaigns urge relatives to ask questions in relation to nursing care and treatment to enhance patient safety and to increase involvement of both patient and relatives. The question is how nurses experience relatives who ask questions. The aim of this study was to explore how nurses experienced contact with patients′ relatives during admissions to a somatic emergency ward including nurses′ experience of relatives asking questions related to nursing care and treatment. Six nurses were interviewed. The participants gave written consent to participate after receiving both oral and written information about the study. Data were analysed using combined theory and data‐driven qualitative content analysis. The findings formed three main themes: (i) relatives’ involvement as a means to efficiency during hospitalisation, (ii) relatives welcomed on the terms of the system and (iii) tension between high ideals and frustrating realities. The six interviews answered the research questions. However, more interviews could have broadened the study and contributed with further details. The nurses experienced relatives as an important resource – ‘an ace up the sleeve’, while reality seemed to challenge the relationship between nurses and relatives. The study contributes to discussions before development and implementation of specific initiatives aiming at increasing involvement of relatives of patients in a somatic emergency ward.
Original languageEnglish
JournalScandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Volume32
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)1207-1214
ISSN0283-9318
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2018

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Hospital Emergency Service
Nurses
Interviews
Patient Safety
Research

Keywords

  • next of kin
  • professional–family–relations
  • risk of inequality
  • patient participation
  • attitude of health personnel
  • hospital emergency service
  • family
  • extended family
  • collaboration with family
  • Humans
  • Middle Aged
  • Family/psychology
  • Male
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Adult
  • Female
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Nurse's Role/psychology
  • Communication
  • Nursing Methodology Research
  • Attitude of Health Personnel
  • Emergency Service, Hospital
  • Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology
  • Professional-Family Relations
  • Aged
  • Qualitative Research

Cite this

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title = "Like an ace up the sleeve an interview study of nurses´ experiences of the contact with relatives in a somatic emergency ward",
abstract = "Research indicates that active involvement of patients′ relatives generally has a positive impact on patients′ hospitalisation, including patient safety. Campaigns urge relatives to ask questions in relation to nursing care and treatment to enhance patient safety and to increase involvement of both patient and relatives. The question is how nurses experience relatives who ask questions. The aim of this study was to explore how nurses experienced contact with patients′ relatives during admissions to a somatic emergency ward including nurses′ experience of relatives asking questions related to nursing care and treatment. Six nurses were interviewed. The participants gave written consent to participate after receiving both oral and written information about the study. Data were analysed using combined theory and data‐driven qualitative content analysis. The findings formed three main themes: (i) relatives’ involvement as a means to efficiency during hospitalisation, (ii) relatives welcomed on the terms of the system and (iii) tension between high ideals and frustrating realities. The six interviews answered the research questions. However, more interviews could have broadened the study and contributed with further details. The nurses experienced relatives as an important resource – ‘an ace up the sleeve’, while reality seemed to challenge the relationship between nurses and relatives. The study contributes to discussions before development and implementation of specific initiatives aiming at increasing involvement of relatives of patients in a somatic emergency ward.",
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author = "Eva Hoffmann and {Riis Olsen}, Pia",
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Like an ace up the sleeve an interview study of nurses´ experiences of the contact with relatives in a somatic emergency ward. / Hoffmann, Eva; Riis Olsen, Pia.

In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 3, 09.2018, p. 1207-1214.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

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AU - Hoffmann, Eva

AU - Riis Olsen, Pia

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N2 - Research indicates that active involvement of patients′ relatives generally has a positive impact on patients′ hospitalisation, including patient safety. Campaigns urge relatives to ask questions in relation to nursing care and treatment to enhance patient safety and to increase involvement of both patient and relatives. The question is how nurses experience relatives who ask questions. The aim of this study was to explore how nurses experienced contact with patients′ relatives during admissions to a somatic emergency ward including nurses′ experience of relatives asking questions related to nursing care and treatment. Six nurses were interviewed. The participants gave written consent to participate after receiving both oral and written information about the study. Data were analysed using combined theory and data‐driven qualitative content analysis. The findings formed three main themes: (i) relatives’ involvement as a means to efficiency during hospitalisation, (ii) relatives welcomed on the terms of the system and (iii) tension between high ideals and frustrating realities. The six interviews answered the research questions. However, more interviews could have broadened the study and contributed with further details. The nurses experienced relatives as an important resource – ‘an ace up the sleeve’, while reality seemed to challenge the relationship between nurses and relatives. The study contributes to discussions before development and implementation of specific initiatives aiming at increasing involvement of relatives of patients in a somatic emergency ward.

AB - Research indicates that active involvement of patients′ relatives generally has a positive impact on patients′ hospitalisation, including patient safety. Campaigns urge relatives to ask questions in relation to nursing care and treatment to enhance patient safety and to increase involvement of both patient and relatives. The question is how nurses experience relatives who ask questions. The aim of this study was to explore how nurses experienced contact with patients′ relatives during admissions to a somatic emergency ward including nurses′ experience of relatives asking questions related to nursing care and treatment. Six nurses were interviewed. The participants gave written consent to participate after receiving both oral and written information about the study. Data were analysed using combined theory and data‐driven qualitative content analysis. The findings formed three main themes: (i) relatives’ involvement as a means to efficiency during hospitalisation, (ii) relatives welcomed on the terms of the system and (iii) tension between high ideals and frustrating realities. The six interviews answered the research questions. However, more interviews could have broadened the study and contributed with further details. The nurses experienced relatives as an important resource – ‘an ace up the sleeve’, while reality seemed to challenge the relationship between nurses and relatives. The study contributes to discussions before development and implementation of specific initiatives aiming at increasing involvement of relatives of patients in a somatic emergency ward.

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KW - extended family

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KW - Middle Aged

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KW - Attitude of Health Personnel

KW - Emergency Service, Hospital

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JO - Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences

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SN - 0283-9318

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