Clients' existential, spiritual and religious needs in clinical settings

Aida Hougaard Andersen, Dorte Toudal Viftrup (Member of author group), Heidi Frølund Pedersen (Member of author group), Kirsten Kaya Roessler (Member of author group)

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPaperResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Clients’ existential, spiritual, and religious needs in clinical settings
Objectives: Existential, spiritual, and religious needs are seldom assessed systematically in therapeutic settings. However, these needs may very well be present and a core concern for the client. Thus, psychologists risk to overlook important needs of the client. In the present study, we tested a method of assessing clients’ existential, spiritual, and religious needs in a private psycho-therapeutic clinic. We investigated how clients described these needs, and how they experienced them in relation to coping.
Methods: Written consents were obtained from 33 clients and expressions concerning existential, spiritual, or religious needs were extracted from the records. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was applied to analyse the qualitative data.
Results: All clients reported religious belief, and more than half described their faith as both a strength and a challenge. Case-analysis showed that psychological aspects were interwoven with religious belief and with the function of the belief. Further, the psychological approach in relation to religious challenges seemed to help clients restructure resulting in a more flexible faith and practice.
Conclusions: Assessing existential, spiritual, and religious needs is a valuable way to understand the clients’ lifeworld. Using a structured approach in clinical practice helps psychologists to prioritise this perspective in the communication with the clients.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date20. Oct 2018
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 20. Oct 2018
EventNordic Conference in Psychology of Religion: Addressing existential questions in health care - Honne Hotel and Conference Center, Biri, Norway
Duration: 22. Oct 201823. Oct 2018

Conference

ConferenceNordic Conference in Psychology of Religion
LocationHonne Hotel and Conference Center
CountryNorway
CityBiri
Period22/10/201823/10/2018

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Religion
Communication

Cite this

Andersen, A. H., Viftrup, D. T., Pedersen, H. F., & Roessler, K. K. (2018). Clients' existential, spiritual and religious needs in clinical settings. 4. Paper presented at Nordic Conference in Psychology of Religion, Biri, Norway.
Andersen, Aida Hougaard ; Viftrup, Dorte Toudal ; Pedersen, Heidi Frølund ; Roessler, Kirsten Kaya. / Clients' existential, spiritual and religious needs in clinical settings. Paper presented at Nordic Conference in Psychology of Religion, Biri, Norway.1 p.
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Andersen, AH, Viftrup, DT, Pedersen, HF & Roessler, KK 2018, 'Clients' existential, spiritual and religious needs in clinical settings' Paper presented at Nordic Conference in Psychology of Religion, Biri, Norway, 22/10/2018 - 23/10/2018, pp. 4.

Clients' existential, spiritual and religious needs in clinical settings. / Andersen, Aida Hougaard; Viftrup, Dorte Toudal (Member of author group); Pedersen, Heidi Frølund (Member of author group); Roessler, Kirsten Kaya (Member of author group).

2018. 4 Paper presented at Nordic Conference in Psychology of Religion, Biri, Norway.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPaperResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Clients' existential, spiritual and religious needs in clinical settings

AU - Andersen, Aida Hougaard

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AB - Clients’ existential, spiritual, and religious needs in clinical settingsObjectives: Existential, spiritual, and religious needs are seldom assessed systematically in therapeutic settings. However, these needs may very well be present and a core concern for the client. Thus, psychologists risk to overlook important needs of the client. In the present study, we tested a method of assessing clients’ existential, spiritual, and religious needs in a private psycho-therapeutic clinic. We investigated how clients described these needs, and how they experienced them in relation to coping. Methods: Written consents were obtained from 33 clients and expressions concerning existential, spiritual, or religious needs were extracted from the records. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was applied to analyse the qualitative data. Results: All clients reported religious belief, and more than half described their faith as both a strength and a challenge. Case-analysis showed that psychological aspects were interwoven with religious belief and with the function of the belief. Further, the psychological approach in relation to religious challenges seemed to help clients restructure resulting in a more flexible faith and practice. Conclusions: Assessing existential, spiritual, and religious needs is a valuable way to understand the clients’ lifeworld. Using a structured approach in clinical practice helps psychologists to prioritise this perspective in the communication with the clients.

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Andersen AH, Viftrup DT, Pedersen HF, Roessler KK. Clients' existential, spiritual and religious needs in clinical settings. 2018. Paper presented at Nordic Conference in Psychology of Religion, Biri, Norway.