Keep on smiling...? An exploration of the gender-specific connections between smiling duration and perceived speaker attributes in business pitches

Lisa Maria Tschinse, Ali Asadi, Anna Gutnyk, Oliver Niebuhr

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Is there an overdose threshold for smiling? If so, is this threshold the same for women and men These questions are addressed in our line of research. The current paper presents the first pilot study of this line of research. It is based on field data from English native speakers. From the hundreds of English-language tutors on italki, we have selected 18, 9 men and 9 women, who represent three different groups of smilers based on visual annotation: non-smilers (smile time in video <5%), occasional smilers (smile time in video 30-50 %), and permanent smilers (smile time in video> 95%). In a perception experiment, we examined the effect of these three groups on listeners using audio-only stimuli (n = 40, within-subjects design). Our results show that smiling makes both male and female speakers more attractive and their voices more pleasant. However, with regard to charismatic, professional and persuasive attributes, it is the occasional smile that turns our best for men, whereas women perform best along these attributes if they do not smile at all. We discuss our findings with a view to (1) phonetic explanations, (2) practical advice and (3) implications for future studies.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProc. 11th International Conference of Speech Prosody, Lisbon, Portugal
Number of pages5
Publication date22. May 2022
Pages624-628
Article number127
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22. May 2022
SeriesInternational Conference on Speech Prosody
ISSN2333-2042

Keywords

  • smile
  • prosody
  • gender
  • charm
  • persuasion
  • charisma
  • Investor pitch
  • business pitch

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Keep on smiling...? An exploration of the gender-specific connections between smiling duration and perceived speaker attributes in business pitches'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this